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first_imgFederal Government | Nation & World | NPR NewsTravel ban legal battles continue, as administration appeals new injunctionMarch 17, 2017 by Camila Domonoske, NPR Share:The Trump administration is appealing a federal judge’s decision to temporarily block the president’s second travel ban from going into effect — setting up another legal showdown in an appeals court.The first version of the ban, temporarily suspending the U.S. refugee program and barring entry into the U.S. from residents of seven majority-Muslim countries, was quickly blocked by a federal judge in Washington state. The Justice Department appealed that temporary restraining order, but a panel of judges from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the suspension of the ban.Then President Donald Trump issued a new ban — one designed to address the legal concerns of the 9th Circuit, the administration says. It omitted Iraq from the list of barred countries, removed references to religion and excluded green card holders and people who already had visas, among other changes.That new executive order was also swiftly challenged in court. Earlier this week, two federal judges in separate courts blocked portions of the ban — a judge in Hawaii imposed a temporary restraining order, and a judge in Maryland granted a narrower, but potentially longer-lasting, preliminary injunction.It’s the Maryland injunction that the Trump administration is moving to appeal, asking the 4th Circuit Court to intervene.Omar Jadwat, the director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project and one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs in the Maryland case, says the ban has “fared miserably in the courts.”“We look forward to defending this careful and well-reasoned decision in the appeals court,” he says, referring to Judge Theodore D. Chuang’s decision to grant the preliminary injunction.The Trump administration had signaled on Thursday that it planned to appeal Chuang’s decision; press secretary Sean Spicer said the administration would seek clarification on the Hawaii ruling before appealing that case.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.Share this story:last_img read more

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first_imgAlcohol & Substance Abuse | Arctic | Crime & Courts | North SlopeFeds arrest 2 after seizing Fentanyl headed to UtqiagvikJanuary 20, 2021 by Wesley Early, KOTZ – Kotzebue Share:“M30” Fentanyl pills similar to the batch recovered by authorities in Anchorage. (Photo courtesy of Drug Enforcement Agency)Two Utqiagvik residents are in custody after officials say they intercepted fentanyl the two intended to sell.According to a charging document, federal postal inspectors in Anchorage flagged a package sent from Arizona to 30-year-old Roberta Sielak of Utqiagvik. Inspectors opened the package and found 2.4 ounces of blue “M30” pills that contained fentanyl, the charges say. The pills were hidden in a vacuum-sealed bag and placed inside the motor housing of an Oster blender, which was in its original packaging, according to the charges.Inspectors removed the pills and placed a tracking device in the package and sent it on to Utqiagvik, along with several federal and state agents, the charges say.Officials say Sielak picked up the package from the Utqiagvik post office on Friday and brought it to 41-year-old Bryon McFadden. McFadden opened the package and, upon hearing the tracking device go off, fled his residence. North Slope police apprehended McFadden and questioned him. He stated he expected the package to contain marijuana, the charges say.Officials searched McFadden’s home and found multiple Oster fan boxes, a white powder believed to be cocaine and an AR-15 style rifle.Both Sielak and McFadden were in custody Tuesday and charged with a federal count of attempted possession of Fentanyl with intent to distribute.Share this story:last_img read more

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first_img whatsapp Share Video Carousel – cityam_native_carousel – 426 00:00/00:50 LIVERead More Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndozenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comUndoMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekUndoComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyUndoGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday NewsUndoNoteableyKirstie Alley Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A BarbieNoteableyUndoEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorUndoBridesBlushThis Is Why The Royal Family Kept Quiet About Prince Harry’s Sister BridesBlushUndoTotal PastAfter Céline Dion’s Major Weight Loss, She Confirms What We Suspected All AlongTotal PastUndo The UK’s private companies experienced a drop in profitability in the last quarter of 2014 – but overall ended the year up. Figures published by the ONS this morning show that non-financial corporations’ profitability, as measured by their net rate of return, came in at an estimated 11.9 per cent for the three months to the end of December.  That was down from 12.3 per cent estimated for the third quarter.   Manufacturing companies had it best – their profitability actually increased to 12 per cent, up from 10.3 per cent between July and September. It was however a drop on the second quarter performance of 13.4 per cent.  Service companies dropped from a record-high 18.4 per cent in Q3 to 16.9 per cent in Q4.  [infographic id=”19″] Continental Shelf (UKCS) companies’ net rate of return was 10.4 per cent, the lowest rate since the series began in 1997.  The year as a whole, however, looked rosier.  The average net rate of return for private non-financial corporations was put at 11.9 per cent – the highest level since 1998, when it reached 12.4 per cent.  whatsapp Catherine Neilan Tags: NULL UK companies’ profitability fell in fourth quarter – but rose overall for 2014 Show Comments ▼ Thursday 9 April 2015 5:13 am last_img read more

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first_imgThe latest analysis does have some limitations, though. Related: Privacy Policy Leave this field empty if you’re human: About the Author Reprints The analysis arrives as drug ads — which are only permitted in the United States and New Zealand — come under fire as a means by which the pharmaceutical industry promotes expensive medicines that increase health care costs. Ad spending soared more than 60 percent in the last four years, hitting $5.2 billion last year. The American Medical Association has called for a ban, and one Washington lawmaker wants to eliminate advertising tax breaks for drug makers.Whether such efforts will prompt any changes is uncertain, but they are being raised partly in response to the increasing cost of prescription medicines, a hot-button issue that has angered many Americans. As a result, the virtues of drug advertising — which has been widely debated on and off for many years — are once again being scrutinized.advertisement PharmalotAll that pharmaceutical advertising may be a ‘mixed bag,’ after all By Ed Silverman Sept. 13, 2016 Reprints Amid the ongoing debate over the wisdom of pharmaceutical advertising, a new analysis suggests that doctors agree more often than not to write prescriptions for patients who have seen drug ads. At the same time, however, the analysis also found that only 1 in 10 consumers were moved by such advertising to ask a doctor for a prescription.The results present a slightly conflicting picture of the extent to which so-called direct-to-consumer advertising poses an unhealthy dilemma, according to the authors of the analysis, published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. While the pharmaceutical industry insists its ads educate consumers, doctors argue some ads too often encourage patients to seek medicines unnecessarily.“I think the data suggests that, if you take a deep dive, we see a mixed bag,” said Sara Becker, an assistant professor of behavioral and social sciences at Brown University, who coauthored the analysis. “Across the board, consumer requests (for prescriptions in response to drug ads) are not happening all that often. But when it does, it raises prescribing volumes.”advertisement Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot Tags drug adsDTC Advertisingprescription drugs Drug makers now spend $5 billion a year on advertising. Here’s what that buys. In an effort to capture what the researchers considered real-time activity involving patient requests and physician prescribing, they ignored after-the-fact surveys. Instead, they reviewed studies that tracked interactions between patients and doctors at what they called the point of service. However, they found just four studies to analyze, but these had not uniformly explored the topic in the same way.For instance, one was a randomized, controlled trial that looked only at the effect of advertising on prescribing antidepressants, and actors were hired to role play. The other three were observational studies, including one that examined prescribing a wider variety of medicines in Canada, where drug advertising is not permitted, although many Canadians may well view ads that can be seen in the US.[UPDATE: It is also worth noting that those three observational studies did not address the extent to which patients may have actually needed medicines for which they sought prescriptions. Becker called this a “big, unanswered question.”]“Our review doesn’t necessarily suggest that advertising is horrible or great,” said Becker. “Although we’re moderately confident that this tells us there can be competing effects on the quality of treatment quality — both better patient adherence and overprescribing. It may have helped in some cases, but less so in others. But more research is needed.” APStock Newsletters Sign up for Pharmalot Your daily update on the drug industry. [email protected] Please enter a valid email address. Ed Silvermanlast_img read more

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first_imgRelatedProfessor Figueroa Urging all Sexually Active Persons to do HIV Test Professor Figueroa Urging all Sexually Active Persons to do HIV Test UncategorizedFebruary 12, 2007 Advertisements RelatedProfessor Figueroa Urging all Sexually Active Persons to do HIV Testcenter_img RelatedProfessor Figueroa Urging all Sexually Active Persons to do HIV Test FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Chief of Epidemiology and AIDS in the Ministry of Health, Professor Peter Figueroa has described HIV/AIDS as a “silent epidemic”, and is encouraging all sexually active persons to do an HIV test.“Anyone who is sexually active needs to do an HIV test in order to know their status, and if you are sexually active, you have to use a condom every time. The only time you cannot use a condom is if both of you have tested and neither of you are having sex with anyone else, which in Jamaica, you often do not know if that is the case,” he said.Professor Figueroa was speaking today (February 12), at the launch of Safer Sex Week by the Ministry, in conjunction with public HIV testing of members of the MVP Track and Field Club, at the University of Technology (UTech).The use of athletes to spearhead the testing and safe sex drive is integral to the observance of this week, as the Ministry focuses on getting healthy young persons to know their HIV status.Safer Sex Week began yesterday (February 11), under the theme: ‘Safe Sex/Good Sex=Rubbers and a Test’, and will continue until February 17.Professor Figueroa pointed out that in Jamaica, an estimated 25,000 persons were living with HIV, with as many as 15,000 unaware that they have the virus. “This is because HIV is a silent virus. When someone becomes infected with the virus through sexual transmission, they do not know that they have become infected, and they may not know for many years, because the virus is just there in the body, multiplying and slowly eating away at the body’s immune system,” he explained.“It is only after an average of eight years that you begin to develop symptoms.that is why we are trying to get across the message of the importance of HIV testing,” Professor Figueroa informed.He emphasized that you cannot tell by looking at someone if he or she has HIV. “You cannot feel the virus, so you can feel perfectly well, you can be an athlete, and still you could be infected and do not know it. So HIV testing is extremely important, in being able to identify persons living with HIV and getting them into treatment early,” he said.“Once you get into treatment early, then you can continue to live a healthy and productive life. If you test negative, then that is an incentive to practise safe sex and remain negative,” Professor Figueroa said.With respect to condom use, which is being emphasized during Safer Sex Week, the Professor said many young persons were unaware of the risks of HIV transmission, or did not believe that they could be affected. “Therefore, we find that not everybody is using a condom consistently and the virus continues to spread,” he said.Professor Figueroa commended the athletes for coming forward to show the rest of the country the importance of HIV testing.Outlining the schedule of activities for Safer Sex Week, he said that some outreach testing has already begun across the island, with more testing scheduled for Clarendon, St. Elizabeth, St. Ann, St. Mary, Manchester, Trelawny, and Hanover.On Wednesday, testing will be conducted at Mandela Park in Kingston, in St. James, Portland, Manchester, St. Elizabeth and Hanover. On Friday, testing will be carried out at the St. William Grant Park in Kingston. Persons may contact the Ministry of Health for a comprehensive list of all the venues for their particular area or parish.“We are also going to do some interventions and possibly testing with the help of the Ionie Whorms Inner City Counselling centre, at parties and dances,” Professor Figueroa said.Among the athletes who participated in this morning’s voluntary testing were Jamaica’s track and field Olympians Brigitte Foster Hylton, Michael Frater, and Sherone Simpson, who are also members of the MVP Track and Field Club.last_img read more

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first_imgInfrastructure delivery to drive Greater Parramatta development The delivery of vital infrastructure will be front and centre for the NSW Government’s strategic planning and delivery of new homes, jobs and open space in and around Greater Sydney’s Central River City.The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment’s Deputy Secretary for Place and Infrastructure in Greater Sydney Brett Whitworth today announced the Department will create a strategic plan for Greater Parramatta and the Olympic Peninsula (GPOP) that sets a 20-year vision for the 6,000-hectare corridor.“Greater Parramatta already has a diverse and growing economy, supporting more than 150,000 jobs and 190,000 people. New infrastructure and strategic planning will bring more jobs, homes, and fantastic open space,” Mr Whitworth said.“Our planning will rely on extensive work already undertaken by the Greater Sydney Commission that details what infrastructure is needed, where and when it should be delivered, and how much it will cost. With this infrastructure assessment already laid out, we can ensure development happens at the right time in the right place.”The Department will develop a strategic plan that includes a staging, sequencing and implementation plan for development from Strathfield to Westmead and Carlingford to Lidcombe as well as a Special Infrastructure Contribution scheme.Mr Whitworth said the Department will also create a Place Strategy for Camellia-Rosehill given its significant strategic role in the economic corridor.“Camellia will be a critical part of Greater Parramatta and the Olympic Peninsula, but it has a number of complicated constraints that require planning for the area to be holistic and strategic, including remediation, flooding and infrastructure requirements.“We will develop a Place Strategy to help transform this industrial area into a vibrant hub to create new jobs, homes, entertainment facilities, open space and a promenade along the Parramatta.”Detailed planning will begin next year with plans to be publicly exhibited for community feedback once ready. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Central, Commission, community, Economy, environment, Government, industry, infrastructure, jobs, New South Wales, NSW, Parramatta, planning, Secretary, space, Sydneylast_img read more

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first_imgProgram offers experiential learning on NYS farms Cornell students will have an opportunity for hands-on learning about ecological approaches to agricultural systems through the new Lund Fellows Program for Regenerative Agriculture in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS).Available to undergraduates across colleges and disciplines, the Lund Fellows Program will launch in summer 2021 with in-person internships that combine rigorous, scientifically based classroom knowledge with practical, applied skills on local farms throughout New York state.Thanks to a gift from Judith Lund Biggs ’57, the Lund Fellows Program will enable students from all backgrounds to spend a summer immersed in a hands-on agricultural experience without worrying about paying for food, lodging or their student financial aid contribution.Applications are now being accepted until April 21. The program hopes to select eight students in the first year.Lund Fellows will spend eight weeks working on small-scale, agro-ecological, biodynamic and/or organic farms around Ithaca, the Hudson Valley and New York City. The intergenerational exchange of knowledge and life experiences between students, farmers and university faculty will raise awareness about the social and economic contexts inherent in diversified farming, while teaching the benefits of sustainable agricultural practices, said Rachel Bezner Kerr, faculty co-lead of the Lund Fellows Program and professor of global development.Designed to help students contribute to the work of the farms and community partners in meaningful ways, the program is actively seeking the participation of students and farmers from diverse disciplines and backgrounds.“We are very excited about the opportunity that this new program provides both to students and farms,” Bezner Kerr said. “Students often can’t afford to take unpaid internships but want to gain experience with regenerative, agro-ecological farming. Host farms will also receive support for the important mentoring and training role that they will provide.”The Lund Fellows Program builds on more than a century of purpose-driven education and experiential learning in CALS. Biodynamic and organic agriculture systems are among the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. agricultural market; the Lund Fellows Program will train future leaders and spread awareness about biodynamic, organic, regenerative and sustainable approaches to farming.“We were thrilled that the Biggs family had the vision to support this program, which we see as a model for training the next generation of farmers,” said Matthew Ryan, faculty co-lead and associate professor in the Soil and Crop Sciences Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science. “We were especially happy that the family recognized the importance of supporting Black, Indigenous and people of color farmers, who often go unrecognized.”Lund Biggs graduated from the College of Arts and Sciences, majoring in American Studies and Government. A longtime volunteer and donor to Cornell, she is inspired by her daughter’s life experience in organic and biodynamic farming in New York and France.Kelly Merchan is a communications specialist in the Department of Global Development. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, american, communications, community, Cornell University, education, first year, France, Government, Indigenous, New York, Professor, research, Ryan, students, sustainable, university, Yorklast_img read more

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first_imgRelatedNew Rules for Scrap Metal Trade New Rules for Scrap Metal Trade CommerceJanuary 24, 2013Written by: Alphea Saunders Scrap metal traders will have to abide by a number of stringent rules to keep their licences, when the trade officially resumes on Monday, January 28.Announcing a raft of rigourous regulations at a press briefing at his New Kingston offices on Thursday (Jan. 24), Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Anthony Hylton, said there is a global demand for scrap metal. He said the Government’s focus is on tightening-up the system, and reinforcement, in order for Jamaica to benefit from the vital foreign exchange the industry attracts.Under the new regulations, all exporters, except those who generate metal waste in their manufacturing operations, will be required to post a $7 million bond with the Factories Corporation of Jamaica (FCJ), which is in charge of the designated central multi-user sites.“The intent is to apply a portion of the bond towards compensation for victims of theft,” Minister Hylton explained.General scrap metal exporters will only be allowed to export from the designated multi-user sites. Two of these are already open – Riverton, and Elsbeth Avenue, off Hagley Park Road. An exporter, who is convicted of theft, will pay a fine of $2 million and lose their licence to operate.“Customs and the police will be posted permanently at the sites and there will be one hundred per cent inspection of all containers…additionally, the police and Customs are authorised to carry out random checks at both exporter and dealer storage sites,” the Industry Minister said.Material will remain on display at sites for five days to facilitate public viewing before loading can begin, and “anything remotely suspect will be detained for investigation by the police and Customs – this material is held for an additional 10 days to allow for viewing by the public,” he stated.Additionally, Mr. Hylton informed that “all exporters are required to submit a police recommendation from a superintendent or an officer of greater rank…the Minister may also request a police report”.He pointed out also, that all exporters, inclusive of dealers, carriers, and handcart transporters, must be in possession of a licence or permit from the Trade Board. Licencing fees range from $5,000 to $10,000. Non-Jamaican nationals must have a work permit.Minister Hylton further outlined that special permits must be obtained from the Minister in order to export restricted materials such as irrigation pipes, railway lines, copper, I-beams, bridges, manhole covers and sign posts. He explained that it was with the support of a technical team that the Minister would make decisions about such requests.The measures will be reviewed after six months, he said.A website, www.scrapalertjamaica.com, has also been mounted by the Factories Corporation where the public can lodge complaints of theft. The site goes live on Monday.Minister Hylton told journalists that all stakeholders have been consulted, and while some are still of the view that the trade should not be re-opened, the general feedback was to go ahead with its resumption. RelatedNew Rules for Scrap Metal Trade RelatedNew Rules for Scrap Metal Tradecenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsScrap metal traders will have to abide by a number of stringent rules to keep their licences, when the trade officially resumes on Monday, January 28.Announcing a raft of rigourous regulations at a press briefing at his New Kingston offices on Thursday (Jan. 24), Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Anthony Hylton, said there is a global demand for scrap metal. He said the Government’s focus is on tightening-up the system, and reinforcement, in order for Jamaica to benefit from the vital foreign exchange the industry attracts.Under the new regulations, all exporters, except those who generate metal waste in their manufacturing operations, will be required to post a $7 million bond with the Factories Corporation of Jamaica (FCJ), which is in charge of the designated central multi-user sites. Advertisementslast_img read more

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first_imgHome “All the kids do it” excuse does not work for FCC chief FCC commissioner eyes further Chinese vendor curbs Tags Previous ArticleFemales spend more money and time on mobile games than males – FlurryNext ArticleAirtel raises $349M through Infratel stake sale Richard Handford Related Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler (pictured), unconvinced by Verizon Wireless’ arguments for its 4G network management policy, has written to other US operators about when they slow down data speeds for their subscribers, according to a number of media reports.“My concern in this instance – and it’s not just with Verizon, by the way, we’ve written to all the carriers – is that it is moving from a technology and engineering issues to the business issues … such as choosing between different subscribers based on your economic relationship with them,” said Wheeler, speaking at a press conference.Verizon Wireless said last week its policy was “a highly targeted and very limited network optimisation effort, only targeting cell sites experiencing high demand.”The operator said the approach was “widely accepted” with the industry, an argument that drew the following response from Wheeler.“’All the kids do it’ was never something that worked with me when I was growing up and didn’t work with my kids,” he said, according to The Wall Street Journal. Wheeler’s comments were also picked up by Reuters.The start of the current spat was a proposal by Verizon Wireless that it might limit network speeds for its heaviest 4G users – equivalent to the top five per cent – during periods of heavy network congestion. Wheeler wrote to the operator, expressing his concern. His letter drew a response from Verizon Wireless, to which the FCC chief then responded late last week. Richard is the editor of Mobile World Live’s money channel and a contributor to the daily news service. He is an experienced technology and business journalist who previously worked as a freelancer for many publications over the last decade including… Read more FCCRegulatoryTome WheelerVerizon Wireless FCC approves $7 billion for emergency connectivity Author AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 11 AUG 2014 FCC mulls expanded Huawei, ZTE banslast_img read more

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first_imgPOLSON – A 19-year-old Polson man has been sentenced to at least 20 years in prison for the November 2010 stabbing death of his mother’s live-in boyfriend.KERR-AM reports Aaron Jess Spang was sentenced Wednesday to 40 years in prison for mitigated deliberate homicide in the death of 32-year-old Frank He Does It. Court records say He Does It was stabbed nine times with a butcher knife.Spang also was sentenced to five years in prison for criminal possession of dangerous drugs. Prosecutors say the stabbing was preceded by an argument between Spang and his mother had over his growing marijuana plants in her house.Spang, who was convicted in April, is not eligible for parole until serving at least 20 years of his sentence. Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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