Tag: 2020年上海哪个区油压多

first_img Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend respite was relaxing and refreshing, because that oh-so-familiar routine of meetings, deadlines, calls, and the like has, of course, returned. You knew this would happen, yes? After all, the world keeps spinning no matter how hard we try to slow things down a bit. So what else is there to do but reach for a cup of stimulation — our choice is whiskey-flavored Jack Daniels — and get started on the journey? Hope yours goes well and, as always, do keep in touch …Pfizer (PFE) plans to acquire Array Biopharma (ARRY) for $11.4 billion in cash, which is known not only for developing its own medicines but as being a top choice among biotechnology firms that need to synthesize new drugs, STAT writes. The deal gives Pfizer access to a pair of drugs that are approved for treating metastatic melanoma. The combined therapy is currently being tested in more than 30 clinical trials for other tumor-related diseases, such as metastatic colorectal cancer. Ed Silverman @Pharmalot Alex Hogan/STAT Pharmalot Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Pharmalittle: Pfizer to buy Array for $11 billion, Teva settlement in Oklahoma may hit a new snag What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprintscenter_img What’s included? Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. GET STARTED [email protected] By Ed Silverman June 17, 2019 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags legalMedicaidMedicareopioidspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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first_imgYour credit union’s planning session is as unique as the credit union itself.  Shared, nevertheless, in many planning sessions is the ability to understand how your credit union remains true to its roots and philosophy while actively searching for changes relevant to your members’ lives.  On one hand, your credit union desires to remain faithful to its beginnings; on the other hand, it must change in order to endure.  Deliberating and establishing your credit union’s non-negotiables and where your credit union is receptive to change is a beneficial step in seeking to include permanence as you also pursue change.As you begin to develop your agenda for this year’s planning session, consider asking these coupled questions of your board.As we plan for the future, what doesn’t change; and what can change?  One board for a credit union that serves law enforcement professionals concluded that its field of membership continued to provide scores of opportunities for deeper relationships.  Unchanged would be the set of professionals it sought to serve.  What could change was the credit union’s reach into other parts of its state where it might serve other law enforcement professionals.  Ultimately, the credit union remained true to its niche roots while growing to help sustain success.Another credit union established a financial non-negotiable: its net worth ratio was to remain at or above nine percent (the ratio was 13 percent).  What could change were growth strategies, timelines, and techniques that the executive team designed and executed.  If a faster rate of growth was required to prosper in a new market, the board understood why the credit union’s capital growth rate may slow as profits had yet to materialize.  All the while, the credit union remained true to its commitment to soundness for its members, but also acknowledged that growth opportunities often require significant, up front capital outlays.Consider building this exercise of permanence and change into your planning session this year.  From it, you will ascertain grounds where your board requests continuous stability for your credit union, but also incorporates continual adaptation.© 2014 by Jeff Rendel.  All rights reserved. 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Jeff Rendel Jeff Rendel, Certified Speaking Professional, and President of Rising Above Enterprises works with credit unions that want elite results in sales, service, and strategy. Each year, he addresses and facilitates … Web: www.risingaboveenterprises.com Detailslast_img read more

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first_imgSupervisor Peter Van Scoyoc and Jim Grimes, an East Hampton Town Trustee.Richard Lewin. Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc and Jim Grimes, an East Hampton Town Trustee.Richard Lewin.It looked so good at first blush.It checked all the hot boxes — Green. Alternate Energy. Zero carbon footprint.We would end our dependence on fossil fuel, the developers promised.But when folks in East Hampton started taking a closer look at a proposed Deepwater Wind project off the coast of Montauk, the negatives began outweighing the positives for a lot of people who felt they would be adversely affected, especially those in the fishing community.When the word spread that Deepwater Wind had hidden the true cost of the electricity it was going to produce for local ratepayers, and that it could end up being much more expensive than that of conventional electricity, there seemed to be a seismic shift in public opinion. At least if the crowd that gathered in East Hampton on May 17 was any indication.Deepwater would generate electricity from its 15 wind turbines, and PSEG/LIPA would purchase all of it for 20 years — but unlike in other states, the parties involved here have steadfastly refused to pin down a price. The wording in the contract is ominous, however: the cost will go up every year.During a public hearing before the East Hampton Town Board and the East Hampton Town Trustees — a rarity — the majority of those who spoke at a packed house in the LTV studio urged town officials not to allow Deepwater to bring its cable ashore on Beach Lane in Wainscott. Many felt the project, though meritorious in concept, was wrong for the town and rallied against other proposed landing spots as well.The erosion of support occurred gradually. During the election, the victorious Democratic candidates favored the development of the wind farm though the Republican challengers didn’t. But recreational and commercial fishermen, some armed with data from wind farms in Europe, reported that the wind turbines are detrimental to fish and fatal to migratory birds.That’s not to say Deepwater did not have some supporters at the public hearing, though company officials did not attend. For example, Roger Clayman said the project “would create union jobs.”Bill Chaleff lamented that the “community is viciously polarized” and said he was “distressed so many are standing on the other side.” The meeting moved along smoothly until East Hampton Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc, who moderated the evening, called Gordian Raacke to the podium.Raacke is Executive Director of Renewable Energy Long Island. Rick Drew, deputy clerk of the trustees, strongly objected. “He is a paid advocate. He is paid by LIPA. He’s paid by Deepwater.”Several others agreed, but Van Scoyoc opted to let Raacke speak.“I’m disappointed in you, Rick,” he said. The supervisor then asked, “Are we going to deny anyone their First Amendment right to free speech?”Raacke took the podium. He disputed other speakers who stated the energy generated by Deepwater would be sold at premium prices to the East End. “We have enough data to know what it will do to our electric rates,” he said.Myles Berkman complained the Deepwater proposal was “bare bones” and urged the boards to order an environmental impact study for the Beach Lane beach. Claudia Diaz warned, “There is no holding the utilities back. The town board is beholden to utilities.” Deepwater, she said, “is ruled by hedge funds.”“I hate fossil fuels. I love wind and alternate energy,” said Ira Barocas, a former town trustees candidate. “But this is not the right project and this is not the right time.”Several fishermen spoke about the dangers to the fisheries. “We don’t want to industrialize our oceans,” said Dan Farnham. “We need baseline studies.”Julie Lofstad, a Southampton Town councilwoman who runs a commercial fishing business with her husband, joined several other speakers in calling for more land-based solar power instead of the wind turbines. If the state persisted pushing offshore wind generators, she urged, “Put it off to New York City somewhere.”Larry Penny, the former director of the East Hampton Town Natural Resource Department, said that the wind generators are wholesale killers of migratory birds and bats. Deepwater has floated a “community benefits package” worth $8.5 million to be divvied up among assorted recipients to grease the skids for its project.“Throw out the community benefits package,” urged Rachel Gruzen. “We do not have enough info; there are significant data gaps. Strict regulatory framework does not exist.”Si Kinsella, who lives near Beach Lane, is no favorite of the town board — its members refused to allow him to be reappointed to the Wainscott Citizens Advisory Committee, a rare occurrence.At the hearing, he set up several charts and began to speak, only to be told his three minutes were up, apparently prematurely. He said afterward he was going to warn those assembled that the Wainscott cable landing wasn’t going to be feasible.That would mean Deepwater would have to bring the cable in at Napeague and run it under Montauk Highway, which has gas lines running underneath. The work would have to be done by hand, he said, and would be cost-prohibitive — somewhere between $92 million and $128 [email protected] Sharelast_img read more

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