Tag: 娱乐地图QF

first_imgCamber Creek’s Jake Fingert, Jeff Berman, and Casey Berman (Credit: LinkedIn)Camber Creek, a venture capital firm focused on real estate tech, is targeting $120 million for its largest fund to date.Launched in 2011, Camber Creek has raised $50 million to date — including an initial $20 million fund and a $30 million second fund in 2017. The company filed paperwork for its latest capital raise with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission last month.It’s invested significantly in real estate technology, backing more than 20 companies, including Latch, VTS, 42Floors (which was acquired by Knotel), Nestio and Vornado spin-off Why Hotel.Camber Creek is based in New York and Maryland, and its investor base includes real estate owners and managers, who collectively own 150 million square feet of commercial real estate nationwide. Camber Creek’s general partners include cousins Casey and Jeffrey Berman, whose family firm Berman Enterprises owns and manages 11 million square feet of real estate, as well as Jake Fingert, a former policy advisor to President Obama.ADVERTISEMENTRepresentatives for Camber Creek did not comment, citing a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule against doing so.Camber Creek is one of many firms re-upping their bets on proptech. New York-based MetaProp, a VC fund and incubator, is raising $100 million for a new fund, The Real Deal reported in May.And last month, Fifth Wall closed a $503 million fund focused on real estate tech — the largest of its kind to date.  Meanwhile, San Francisco-based Brick & Mortar Ventures, founded by Bechtel scion Darren Bechtel, launched a $100 million fund focused exclusively on construction tech.And, of course, SoftBank is planning a second $100 billion Vision Fund.Overall investment in real estate tech startups topped $12.9 billion during the first half of 2019, up from a record $12.7 billion in all of 2017.Just last week, two WeWork rivals announced new funding rounds. Knotel announced a $400 million round led by Wafra, the investment arm of the Sovereign Wealth Fund of Kuwait, bumping its valuation to north of $1.3 billion. A day later, Industrious said it had raised $80 million. This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

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first_imgFáilte Ireland today announced the installation of new engaging interpretation panels at all of its 188 Discovery Points along the Wild Atlantic Way – including Donegal. The panels feature local stories that bring the Wild Atlantic Way proposition to life at each Discovery Point location. The stories were identified as a direct result of local consultation and engagement with local historians, heritage officers and other local experts.Already panels have been erected in Donegal, Sligo, Mayo and Galway with signs for the southern stretch (all the way down to West Cork) due in the coming weeks. Welcoming the development, Minister of State for Tourism and Sport, Patrick O’Donovan said:“The Wild Atlantic Way is an evolving attraction and will continue to develop additional layers of experience over the coming years. Already, the route is proving very popular and I am confident that our ongoing investment in the initiative will enable it to generate additional jobs and revenue for communities all along the western seaboard.”Speaking today, Fáilte Ireland’s Head of the Wild Atlantic Way, Fiona Monaghan explained the thinking behind the new panels:“The rationale for the panels is to provide visitors with local stories which will add layers to the Wild Atlantic Way experience and bring each of our existing discovery points to life for tourists. A key part of this phase of our development of the Wild Atlantic Way project has been a close and productive partnership with local experts and historians as well as with the individual local authorities along the route.” Last year, Fáilte Ireland had developed Photo Points at each of the Discovery Points and Embarkation Points along the route. The Photo Points were designed to literally ‘frame’ photographs taken by visitors at the beauty spots and scenic views along the route. The new interpretation panels are being installed next to each Photo Points and are intended to tell visitors a little of the history and heritage of the area. Each panel also includes historic or scenic images, a small motivational map and identifies some other local points of interest – with a call to ‘Discover more’.Wild Atlantic Way makes its ‘point’ in Donegal was last modified: January 27th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalpanelsWild Atlantic Waylast_img read more

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first_imgOrdinary_researchers claim to have also mailed the documents, which include details of the grants used to support the research, to the ministries of education and health, funding agencies, academic societies, and the media; the latter resulted in fairly extensive coverage of the allegations in Japan. Several commentators have noted that the lessons of past scientific scandals have apparently not been learned. “If the accusations are true, some leading laboratories in the University of Tokyo have continued falsification and fabrication [for] as long as 10 years,” says Masahiro Kami, a former University of Tokyo medical researcher who is now executive director of the Tokyo-based Medical Governance Research Institute, which strives to improve the practice of medicine in Japan. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email The University of Tokyo today announced it is launching an investigation into anonymously made claims of fabricated and falsified data appearing in 22 papers by six university research groups. An individual or group going by the name “Ordinary_researchers” detailed questions about data and graphs in more than 100 pages delivered to the university in two batches on 14 and 29 August.The university did not name the researchers or the publications that have come under suspicion, but the documents were also posted online in Japanese. They identify mostly biomedical papers that appeared in Nature, Cell, The New England Journal of Medicine, and several other journals. The corresponding author on seven of the papers is physician and diabetes specialist Takashi Kadowaki, a former director of the university hospital who’s still on the faculty at the school of medicine. “This is a totally groundless and false accusation by a faceless complainant,” Kadowaki told ScienceInsider in an email. “We have absolute confidence in all of our data,” he wrote. Today’s announcement of a full probe came after the university conducted a preliminary investigation. The announcement emphasized that this step did not confirm any misconduct. The school’s internal regulations call for half the investigative panel members to come from outside the university. Click to view the privacy policy. 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