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first_imgEmployee absenteeism remains one of the most common workforce problems in today’s workplace.Absenteeism problems can range from employees not showing up without notifying their employer to using sick leave for vacation. Some abusers habitually use all of their paid time off every month.Many workplace absences are covered by federal laws like FMLA and ADA, but, for the nonprotected cases, employers should be swift and consistent with the administration of discipline.With technology and telecommuting policies allowing employees to work from anywhere, absenteeism is no longer defined as an employee not physically in the workplace, but as an employee who is “AWOL” or absent without login.Earlier this year, SHRM and Kronos conducted a study of the impact of employee absence on organizations and employees. According to Joyce Maroney, director of Workforce Institute at Kronos, “The holiday season is, of course, particularly hard hit with employee absences. We’ve done research on this topic before, though the emphasis has been largely on the financial impact of absence. This study, like the prior research, underscores the greater impact that unplanned absenteeism has on the bottom line.”Employee absenteeism can also harm workforce morale. Maroney says that “What we found was that the party affected most by unplanned absences seems to be colleagues, as the study shows that their perceived productivity loss is most affected (29.5% productivity loss for co-workers in the U.S.) Co-workers report feeling more stressed when their colleagues are out, especially when those absences are unplanned.”Organizations can’t avoid absences, but there are things they can do to lessen the impact, such as establishing a formal attendance policy and giving supervisors the training and support they need to administer it.How does absenteeism affect your organization and how do you manage it?Please join SHRM @weknownext at 3 p.m. ET on January 7 for a #Nextchat with special guest Joyce Maroney (@WF_Institute), director of the Workforce Institute at Kronos, and SHRM Researcher Karen Wessels (@SHRM_Research). We’ll chat about the impact of employee absence on the workplace.Q1.  Does your organization have a formal written attendance policy? If not, how do you manage attendance?Q2. As an HR professional or supervisor, what aspect of workplace absenteeism gives you the most heartburn? Q3. What problems do unplanned workplace absences cause for your organization outside of decreased morale?Q4.  What types of absenteeism and paid/unpaid time off abuse are most common in your organization and industry (ADA, Friday/Monday)?  Q5. Does your organization offer sick leave donation programs and have you found them to be beneficial or exploited?  Q6.  What FMLA and ADA absence issues do you struggle with the most?Q7. Has technology/telecommuting deceased absenteeism rates in your organization? Q8. What incentives, if any, does your organization offer for excellent attendance? How do you define excellent attendance? Q9. What occasions would you nominate for an official U.S. national holiday? (Super Bowl Monday?)What’s a Twitter chat?last_img read more

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first_imgWhere should a first-time supervisor start? This is the question Joseph F. Duffy sets out to answer in his book Being a Supervisor 1.0 (Business Books, 2018). After 45 years as an executive with Catholic Charities, Duffy knew there needed to be one resource—a “cookbook,” as he calls it—that provides all the basics of supervising, from decision making to conflict resolution to strategizing. Heralded for his insights into the nonprofit world and extensive work in supervisor-training, Duffy recently discussed with us how his book will change the way supervisors approach their roles by shaping them into “better listeners, better communicators, and better delegators.”How does your book cater to both new, young supervisors as well as older, more experienced ones?With regard to the younger or less experienced supervisors, I intended for it to be a stand-alone “cookbook”—a how-to for handling conflict resolution, decision making, etc. For the more experienced supervisors, it’s still a cookbook, they’re just looking at it through the lens of someone who has already been doing those things. They get the opportunity to question how this book may suggest a recipe different from theirs, and from there they can evaluate their processes and alternatives. It might even stimulate some thinking as to even more ways to do the job.Was there a moment or aspect of your career that inspired you to write this book?It was growing over the years. I’ve always been committed to developing the people I hire and work with. Many times, I was frustrated because I really wanted to give them one source that they could use to get started. Then, once I retired, I had a little more time on my hands. Over the years, I was good at keeping files and records on those specific topics—conflict resolution, decision making, positive work environment—so I had a lot of resources to turn to when I started writing.The rate of change in leadership across all business organizations is rapidly increasing. How does your book respond to this development?I think it prepares the supervisor to deal better with change. That’s very much a phenomenon we’ve seen—there’s a tremendous amount of turnover. So if the supervisor and employees are well-prepared, they’ll be better able to communicate with each other, they will have strategies, they will trust new people when they come on.How do you think the role of the supervisor is different between nonprofit and for-profit organizations?I think it’s the same and different. Nonprofits, since the very beginning and by legislation, are held in trust for the communities they serve. That’s a mission statement right in your paperwork—”This is our purpose.” That mission has to drive everything you do for the betterment of the community. If it’s a good nonprofit, it really stresses that everybody needs to know what the mission is [and] needs to be committed to it, and that needs to drive your decisions as a supervisor.For-profits, going back a couple of decades now at least, have been getting more into the idea of a mission statement—but it’s still not tied to that sacred trust to care for the community that nonprofits have. The underlying basis of a mission for for-profits is to have a return on investment—they have to make money. It’s not that nonprofits don’t make money—because if you don’t have a margin, you won’t have any mission—but the underlying purpose that’s driving what nonprofit supervisors do is coming from a different place than the for-profits.But, increasingly, over the past three or four decades, nonprofits have also been shifting to operating under business-like principles. Nonprofits learn from the for-profits more about how to be a business without losing sight of their mission. If nonprofits don’t have a margin, they won’t have a mission because they won’t be able to serve people. So nonprofit supervisors also have to be business-minded in all their decision making.How can HR professionals help aid the supervisors within their company?HR has become much more professionalized over the years, and there’s a tremendous amount of knowledge that HR professionals have to have in order to do their job well. They should be a resource for all the employees in the company. One of the chapters [in my book] has to do with the dynamic learning environment—being an organization that commits to ongoing education and training employees. That’s an action through which the HR department could be a tremendous resource.Sometimes management is suspicious of HR because HR is there to protect the employees. HR folks have a fine line to walk—they are there to support management but they’re also there to make sure employees are treated fairly, and sometimes those two butt heads. So it’s important for the HR professionals not to wait to be called on by the supervisor, but instead to get out there and show the supervisor and management staff “This is what we can do to help make your job easier.”Originally published on the SHRM Book blog.last_img read more

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first_imgWhile YouTube and onlinevideo is all the rage currently, I often wonder if there’s anything on these videowebsites other than mentos-cokeexplosions and bad singing.Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy YouTube as much as the next person – but I am also a bitartsy-fartsy, so I like to see artistic stuff being done on the Web too. One such projectis Stray Cinema, which describes itself as “an opensource film project”.Stray Cinema invitespeople to create short films, based on raw footage that was filmed in London on a digitalcamera. The idea is that participants download the footage and edit parts of itinto their own 2 minute film. Links to freeediting software is provided – e.g. Avid, WindowsMovie Maker, Video EditMagic and Wax. The films are then uploaded onto YouTube and embedded into the Stray Cinemawebsite. Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Stray Cinema is also contacting independent musicians and bands, via social networkingsites like MySpace, to incorporate their music into the process.Once there are 30 film submissions on the website, the community of Stray Cinema userswill vote for their favourite films. The top 5 films will be screened in London alongsidethe directors cut. There will be VJ’s at the event, mixing film footage to live music.Also there will be a live audiovisual webcast, live web-chat, vodcasting and blogging.The date for the event is yet to be determined.Stray Cinema is aiming to be an annual event, repeating the process with raw footagefilmed in a different city each year. All of this is being run by 7 people and there are479 registered users. OK so it’s not a trendy startup with millions of users, but to mymind it’s excellent use of Web technologies. Check it out if you’re interested in filmand how web 2.0 technologies can be used to create and promote independentfilm-making. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Video Services#web richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

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first_imgA California city’s electric utility rate did not need voter approval. The rate did not exceed the reasonable costs of providing electric service.California Constitution on New TaxesThe utility rate was not a tax under the Constitution. The California Constitution requires voter approval in order for local governments to impose, increase or extend a tax. However, a charge imposed for a service is not a tax if it does not exceed the reasonable costs of providing the service.Costs Covered by the RateThe taxpayers claimed that the city embedded in its rate a charge to compensate for services provided by other departments. Other city departments provided services to the utility like police and fire protection, billing, finance, and fleet maintenance. To cover this cost, the city made an annual transfer from the utility’s enterprise fund to the city’s general fund.This transfer was also known as a “payment in lieu of taxes” (PILOT). The transfer equaled the amount a private utility would pay in property taxes. When the city raised its electric utility rate, it characterized the PILOT as an operational expense. The taxpayers argued that the rate increase required voter approval because it covered the PILOT.Rate Did Not Exceed CostsBut the utility’s projected rate revenues were less than its costs of providing electric service even without the PILOT. Further, California law did not require the city to subsidize the utility’s rates with non-rate revenues.All rate revenues went towards covering the utility’s uncontested operating costs. Other non-rate revenues covered the remaining shortfall and the PILOT.Citizens for Fair REU Rates v. City of Redding, California Supreme Court, No. S224779, August 27, 2018, ¶406-821Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

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first_img After you’re done with all the gift giving this week, treat yourself to a show at the Blockley before it closes forever at the end of the year. The reggae-rock band Spiritual Rez will bring their big energy and fun spirit to fans who enjoy music that sound like the simultaneous meshings of Bob Marley and Matisyahu. Watch the band perform songs from their 2010 project Nexus, and their upcoming album Apocalypse Whenever, that’s set to be released February 15, and features mastering from legendary engineer Howie Weinberg, who has worked with major acts Beastie Boys, Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Prince. Secure your spot at this amazing show by grabbing your tickets here. Event Details Spiritual Rez At The Blockley When: Saturday, December 28, 8 p.m. Where: The Blockley, 3801 Chestnut Street Cost: $10 – $13 More Info: theblockley.com The Blockleylast_img read more

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