Month: February 2021

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSuleiman Baraka, the eldest of 14 children of a Palestinian butcher, rose from humble beginnings in violence-wracked Gaza to become an astrophysicist, space weather expert and researcher for NASA, the US space agency.Now, at 45, he is back home with a new mission: to teach kids to look up from their blockaded, beaten-down surroundings and into the limitless beauty of the universe.(READ the AP Story at Jerulsalem Post)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreMoney can buy you happiness, especially if you share it with others.“There is some science to this, literally,” said Robert Ashcraft, executive director of the Lodestar Center for Philanthropy & Nonprofit Innovation at Arizona State University. “There are studies done about the physical and mental reaction that people have in the act of giving time, as well as money.”Find a cause that speaks to you, share a few dollars and wait for the endorphins to hit. “It’s a runner’s high, particularly when the giving is purely voluntary and given as generosity,” Ashcraft said.— READ the story about giving at AZcentral.com— WATCH the video as proof that giving fuels happiness!AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe controversial government bailout of the huge global insurer, AIG, during the worst days of the financial crisis in 2008, will yield billions of profit for the US treasury and taxpayer.The treasury department announced Tuesday that it will sell 234 million shares in American International Group (AIG), bringing the estimated profit on the original AIG TARP assistance to $22.7 billion.The department said more than 90%, or about $380 billion, of the $418 billion spent under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) during the financial crisis has been recovered through repayments and other income. Other TARP investment sales were announced this week, including  Virginia Commerce Bank, and Century Financial Services Corp. in Santa Fe, both of which took relief deals. As the New York-based AIG corporation teetered on the brink of collapse four years ago, the government invested more than $182 billion in AIG to keep its potential demise from undermining the U.S. and world economies. At one point, the U.S. owned 92 percent of the company, which had invested heavily in real estate loans that turned bad when borrowers stopped making payments. The latest stock sale leaves the government with only a small remaining connection to the multi-national company.In the four years years, AIG has trimmed its operations, cutting its portfolio from $1 trillion to $550 billion, and is concentrating on providing property, life and retirement insurance products. The company says it has met its obligations to the government and has been profitable for four straight quarters.The Financial Stability Oversight Council, a group of regulators including the Treasury and the Fed, is debating whether to declare AIG a “systemically important financial institution.” Such a declaration would subject AIG to much tighter regulations, under the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, according to an article by Mark Gongloff in the Huffington Post.(From Voice of America, and other sources)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIt is hard to believe, but last spring Emma, then 6, was near death from leukemia. She had relapsed twice after chemotherapy, and doctors had run out of options.Desperate to save her, her parents sought an experimental treatment at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, one that had never before been tried in a child, or in anyone with the type of leukemia Emma had. The treatment very nearly killed her. But she emerged from it cancer-free.(READ the story in the New York Times)Thanks to Joel Arellano for submitting the link on our Facebook Page!File photo by Sun StarAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore28-year-old Sarah Outen has become the first woman to row a boat solo from Japan to Alaska, arriving at a small town in the Aleutian Islands after an ordeal that included capsizing five times.After the five month journey, the British adventurer enjoyed a hot bath, home-cooked meal and a “fabulous welcome” from the people of Adak.“I have had some of the most intense and memorable months of my life out on the Pacific. It has been brilliant and brutal at the same time,” Outen said in a statement.(READ the AP story in the Guardian)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreCORRECTION: Using a February 16, 2016 United Press International article as the main source, we incorrectly dated this story. The Senate confirmation actually took place in May, 2014. Good News Network apologizes for the misinformation but will leave this article posted as background for an “On This Day in History” mention, that we previously published here.______________________________A former prosecutor and judge for her Hopi tribe has become the first Native American woman to become a federal judge.The U.S. Senate unanimously confirmed Diane Humetewa to a District Court bench in Arizona on Monday (see correction above). She’s only the third Native American to serve as a federal judge, and the only one currently to be serving.GET OUR NEW GOOD NEWS APP—>  Download FREE for Android and iOSThe National Congress of American Indians issued a statement saying it hoped her appointment would lead to more highly qualified Native Americans being appointed to judgeships.There are 21 Native American reservations in Arizona and all felonies on those lands are tried in federal court.CHECK OUT: Taiwan’s First Woman President Becomes Most Powerful Woman in Chinese Speaking World“We do not have a bench that reflects the community it serves,” Former U.S. Attorney Paul Charlton told the Arizona Republic. “And now, for the first time in our nation’s history, we’ll have a representative.”Photo: Activedia, CC; U.S. Govt AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis revolutionary device has already saved thousands of animals from a terrible fate.Though biologist Rich Mason normally works to conserve wildlife around the vast brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay, he was also concerned about the dozens of frogs perishing in his friend’s backyard pool in every summer. As a means of offering small animals a safe exit from the pool, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employee created the FrogLog: a flotation ramp that attaches to the edge of pools.MORE: 10-Year-old Boy Invents Device That Will Save Children From Hot CarsThe floating critter dock is surrounded by a mesh skirt that allows trapped chipmunks, lizards, frogs, and squirrels to easily exit the water. The FrogLog’s key feature is a small ramp that leads to dry land.Since Mason started marketing the FrogLog, which is anchored by a weighted base outside the pool, dozens of buyers have posted photos of the device’s success at saving their wild backyard friends.“We have had this in the pool all summer and have had no critters lost. Normally there were 2 or 3 frogs a week, but none this year,” says Amazon buyer Johnny_B. “It helps all kinds of animals.”RELATED: 12-Year-old Saves Friend’s Leg Using First Aid From ‘Hunger Games’ BookIf you’re worried about larger animals like household pets, have no fear – the Skamper-Ramp is a large easily-accessible ramp for cats and dogs to safely exit the swimming pool.PETA names several other ways in which you can prevent animals from stumbling into your pools – like making sure to keep your backyard trees trimmed. Young forest critters are notorious for accidentally falling out of tree branches and into pools below.The animal rights organization also warns that wildlife will often wander onto human property in search of food. In order to ward off possible animal trespassers, keep all of your trashcans secure, and be sure not to give food scraps to your backyard friends.(WATCH the video below)Click To Share This Pawesome Story With Your Friends – OR,  (Photo by FrogLog)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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first_imgThe University’s International Development Studies (IDS) minor not only affords students the opportunity to study the challenges facing developing countries in the classroom, but it also allows them to go out and research these difficulties for themselves. Senior IDS minor Kristen Kelly spent the past two summers in rural Uganda conducting research on participatory development initiatives and the importance of women in these community-driven projects. “Issues, challenges and ideas regarding the struggle for this development have wholly and completely enthralled me,” Kelly said. “I love anything and everything related to development.” The Ford Family Program in Human Development Studies and Solidarity, which is housed at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, created the IDS minor four years ago. Economics and political science professor Amitava Dutt, who is also a fellow at the Kellogg Institute, said the minor requires five courses, including a gateway and a capstone course and a summer research project. “The main focus is to allow students to develop a deep understanding of international development by taking courses from a range of disciplines, given the interdisciplinary nature of the subject, conduct field research in a developing country and write an essay related to their research,” he said. The interdisciplinary nature of the minor attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds, Dutt said, such as the social sciences, philosophy, business and history. Part of the program’s popularity stems from its duality as a field of study that is both practically important and intellectually interesting, he said. “Students in the program share, with the faculty, a deep commitment to the issue of development in the poorer countries of the world, arguably one of the most important and difficult problems faced by the world today,” Dutt said. Kelly, one such student committed to alleviating these issues, said she decided to minor in IDS as soon as she learned of the program. “The ability to grapple with some of the most pressing development challenges of our time, for some of the most vulnerable people in the world, with some of the most passionate students and professors on campus was an opportunity I could not miss out on,” she said. In addition to her two summers in Uganda, Kelly said the minor has provided her with a wide range of opportunities at Notre Dame. “I have focused my entire course of study, as well as the extracurricular activities I participate in here at Notre Dame, around issues of international development,” she said. “I have also presented my research at a couple of different conferences, allowing me to share my passion and research findings with other interested students and academic professionals.” As a senior, Kelly said her background in IDS is instrumental in pursuing her chosen career path. She hopes to join an organization that is committed to fighting for human rights of the most vulnerable world citizens. In particular, Kelly said she wishes to continue working on development problems both in the United States and in the countries that require assistance. “As the IDS minor has taught me, we can’t hope to fix any of the world’s problems by sitting in a classroom or office reading about them,” she said. “If we hope to make any difference at all, we must engage in meaningful conversations with the people afflicted by these development challenges.”last_img read more

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first_imgNotre Dame welcomed juniors’ parents to campus last weekend, this time not to cheer for Irish football, but to attend Junior Parents Weekend (JPW).A committee of 13 juniors, led by JPW chairperson Shannon Hagedorn, planned the event, which aimed to expose parents to the strong sense of tradition at Notre Dame.“My goal for this year’s JPW was to make it a really special and elegant weekend,” Hagedorn said. “In selecting the program pictures, centerpieces and decorations, I tried to represent the tradition and magic of Notre Dame.”Even though severe storms in the Northeast prevented some parents from attending, 4,000 people were involved in the weekend’s events, Hagedorn said. Photo courtesy of Shannon Hagedorn Juniors and their parents mingle at the Junior Parents Weekend dinner Saturday in the Joyce Center. More than 4,000 people attended the weekend’s events, which also included a gala and dorm brunches.Hagedorn said the weekend involved a number of diverse events, including a gala, collegiate workshops, a JPW Mass and a president’s dinner.“It was so fun to see everyone mingling and dancing at the gala, meeting professors at the academic workshops, coming together for the Mass and sharing dinner and brunch together with incredible speakers, including keynote speakers [University President Fr. John] Jenkins, [junior class president] Olivia LaMagna and [director of the Institute for Educational Initiatives Fr. Timothy] Scully,” Hagedorn said.Junior Stephanie Scherer said JPW opened her eyes to how large the junior class was.“Sometimes you don’t realize how many people you don’t know until you’re all in one place,” Scherer said.Junior Catherine Puma said student involvement in the event helped build community within the junior class.“I feel a better sense of community, especially since we had student speakers, because so many people were involved,” Puma said.Junior Kathryn Bush said the experience gave her parents a chance to better understand her life at Notre Dame.“[Our] parents liked to see how we made the University our own,” Bush said.The weekend was not only an opportunity for students to interact, but for parents to meet their children’s friends and their parents, Puma said.JPW also reminded students that graduation is closer than they think, Scherer said.“It gives us a sense that we don’t have much time left here, so we want to enjoy it and have an impact before we leave,” she said.last_img read more

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first_imgDrawing on the results of 80 interviews from members of the private sector of the workforce in Cuba, Carmelo Mesa-Lago, distinguished service professor emeritus of economics and Latin American studies at the University of Pittsburgh, delivered a lecture Tuesday called “Voices of Change from the Non-State Sector in Cuba” at the Hesburgh Center. The lecture focused on economic changes in Cuba over the past several years. The results of the interviews have already been published in the book “Voces de Cambio en el Sector no Estatal en Cuba,” which Mesa-Lago co-authored. An English version of the book will be available in the fall of 2017.According to Mesa-Lago, the rise of the private sector in Cuba can be attributed to economic reforms made under Raul Castro. While there is some information available on the impact of these reforms, Mesa-Lago and his co-authors wanted to look at the reforms from a new angle.“Although we have substantial information in terms of this non-state sector, we didn’t know what the feelings of the people involved in that sector were,” he said. “We wanted to find out, ‘What do they think about so many important issues that they are dealing with?’”As a result of the research and interviews, Mesa-Lago said this project has been a unique one for him.“I have written a lot of books, and I have never been more involved in a book like this because for the first time I was hearing the Cuban people talking, and that was fascinating for me,” he said.The project is also relevant due to the growing private sector in Cuba, Mesa-Lago said. In 2015, 71 percent of those employed worked in the state sector, which was a decrease from previous years, he said.Mesa-Lago said the interviews were primarily conducted with people who work in non-agricultural production and service cooperatives, usufruct farmers and those who buy and sell private dwellings.The group of people who work in cooperative farms is especially important, according to Mesa-Lago.“It’s a tiny group, but they play an important role because Cuba gives preference to the cooperatives over self-employment because it’s a more advanced socialist form of organization and therefore they have an advantage over self-employment,” he said.Mesa-Lago described the private workforce as “young, male, white, with very high education.”While he said this is not typical of the Cuban population, he was more surprised by the satisfaction of the workers than the lack of a representative population. From the interviews, 80 percent of the workers were satisfied in the non-state sector, and only five percent identified themselves as unsatisfied.“This is very interesting and surprising because they face a lot of problems – regulation, inspections, taxes, etc.,” Mesa-Lago said.The main problems these workers face involves their inputs and state interference, Mesa-Lago said. Since 25 percent of the inputs can only be obtained from a state shop, according to Mesa-Lago, the workers have a lack of options in obtaining their resources.The interviews also revealed that state interference and bureaucracy was a common problem with the private sector, with 27 percent of the interviewees mentioning it as a problem they faced in their business.Aggregating the results of the interviews, Mesa-Lago said people working in the non-state sector want three primary changes — more liberty, less state regulation and interference and more estate incentives and guarantees. These requests signal to Mesa-Lago the desires of the voices in change in the country moving forward.Tags: Carmelo Mesa-Lago, Cuba, Private Sector Employmentlast_img read more

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