Category: ozpfdjco

first_imgRelated contentRelated contentShare VideoShare Video AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 06 JAN 2016 Play Video Playing onSubtitlesLanguageSettingsQualityAutomatic Automatic HDSpeedNormalQualityAutomaticSpeed0.250.5Normal1.251.52Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%PlayPlayMuteMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00LiveRemaining Time -0:00 Watch in VRWatch in VRdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionsSubtitlesSubtitlesUnavailable UnavailableUnavailable UnavailableLanguageLanguageSettingsHDSettingsFullscreenFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDone HomeCES 2016 Vid CES Day 1 Video Highlights Powered by THEOplayer 2021.1.3Close Related ContentClose ShareThe Mobile World Live team is back in Vegas! Press Day this year saw major events from Ford, Huawei, Intel, Qualcomm and Samsung and we’ve footage of all the big news. Previous ArticleIntel CEO shows off the power of CurieNext ArticleMillicom Africa chief hits out at internet giantslast_img read more

Read more

first_img Tags Chris Donkin Previous ArticleTelegram makes fresh appeal over Russia banNext ArticleBrightstar seeks second-hand smartphone boost Home Safaricom CFO slams plan to hike mobile money tax Vodafone, Safaricom beat MTN to Ethiopia licence Safaricom holds Amazon talks on mobile money move Safaricom negocia el uso de m-Pesa como medio de pago en Amazon Money center_img Author AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 19 JUN 2018 Safaricom CFO Sateesh Kamath (pictured) hit out at proposals to increase tax on mobile money transactions in Kenya, stating it would slow down a drive to reduce cash usage, Reuters reported.Earlier in June, Kenya finance minister Henry Rotich unveiled proposals to increase the tax on mobile cash transfers to 12 per cent from the 10 per cent currently levied, a move Kamath said would most harshly impact the poorer members of society.The tax measures have not yet been approved by parliament: in an interview with Reuters, the Safaricom executive said the imposition of the increased tax would hamper existing government policy on reducing cash usage.Kenya is one of the world leaders in mobile money and is frequently cited in reports from international development agencies as a model for other nations looking to boost financial inclusion. However, by increasing taxation, Kamath argues the government risks reversing much of the progress made.Safaricom is the leading mobile operator by connections and dominant mobile money platform in Kenya.In recent months, however, reports have emerged suggesting the country’s communications regulator is set to introduce measures to try and curb Safaricom’s market dominance as a number of political figures call for the business to be split. Chris joined the Mobile World Live team in November 2016 having previously worked at a number of UK media outlets including Trinity Mirror, The Press Association and UK telecoms publication Mobile News. After spending 10 years in journalism, he moved… Read more Related SafaricomSateesh KamathTaxlast_img read more

Read more

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 18 OCT 2019 HomeFeatured Content Mobile Mix: Scaling summits in Switzerland and Spain UnavailableLanguageLanguageSettingsHDSettingsFullscreenFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDone Previous ArticleFeature: AI powers network automationNext ArticleAT&T in talks to diffuse shareholder row Powered by THEOplayer 2021.1.3Close Related ContentClose ShareThis week Diana is in Zurich at Huawei’s annual Global Mobile BroadBand Forum and Manny hit Barcelona for Qualcomm’s 5G summit, as executives at both events turned focus to the next phase of development for the technology following initial launch. In London, Yanitsa has the news. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Play Video Playing onSubtitlesLanguageSettingsQualityAutomatic Automatic HDSpeedNormalQualityAutomaticSpeed0.250.5Normal1.251.52Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%PlayPlayMuteMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00LiveRemaining Time -0:00 Watch in VRWatch in VRdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionsSubtitlesSubtitlesUnavailable UnavailableUnavailable Related contentRelated contentShare VideoShare Videolast_img read more

Read more

first_img Air cargo shippers and forwarders can expect a greater focus on quality at Brussels Airport, as well as enhanced Belgian government relations.The innovative airport, whose team started the CEIV trend, has established an air cargo community organisation, Air Cargo Belgium (ACB), mirroring those at airports such as Schiphol and Frankfurt.European airports have recently been taking a noticeably firm lead in promoting the air cargo business – and this new initiative continues that trend.While logistics companies in Brussels are already part of various associations, such as BAFI for forwarders and ACMAB for cargo airlines, ACB gives the group better resources and an ability to work with companies across the air cargo supply chain, as well as with the government.Head of cargo at the airport Steven Polmans is chairing ACB. He said: “Logistics is very important both for our federal as well as our regional government.“Up to now, we’ve had support on a project basis, such as our pharma project or our cloud community system. With the new set up, we are looking at getting some structural financial support rather than just project support.”It has taken four years to get the project off the ground. Along with the airlines, forwarders, handlers, airport and the chamber of commerce, “it was important to have some of the bigger and more important companies as part of our new organisation from the start, as this would give us more credibility and resources and a better representation of the industry in our board,” he added.ACB will have its own budget and will focus on the whole cargo community at Brussels.“It really creates a change in mindset,” Mr Polmans told The Loadstar.“A lot of airports are starting to be actively involved in cargo and are often driving changes – the very strong competition in our region stimulates this. I also think that, at an airport where a lot of companies come together, you often can create the right set-up to aim for this change.“At an industry level, this is not always possible, one company worldwide can not always create the right environment and scale at each location. But at a certain point it all comes together in one location, an airport, where you are sitting physically together. Add some willingness and increased interest of airports in the cargo process, and change is possible.”Mr Polmans has been a strong advocate of change across the air cargo industry, and has said previously it was time to act, not talk any more. At the World Cargo Symposium in Berlin last month he urged the industry to put more effort into increasing the overall value of the business, rather than merely stealing market share from one another.“We need to spend 5% of the time not on our own companies, but on the industry. That would make the industry better.”lain De Heldt, chairman of the Belgian Airfreight Institute said ACB would bring added value to customers.“I feel confident that we are at the beginning of a great development, where quality and expertise are key. If we strive for ‘best in class’, cargo volumes will come automatically.”The news comes as Volga-Dnepr Group announced it had signed a strategic agreement – including guaranteed volumes – with Sheretmetyevo Airport to boost the air cargo industry in Russia.The agreement, said the airport’s director general Michael Vasilenko, “embraces not only the quantitative side where Volga-Dnepr Group guarantees an agreed volume of transit, transfer and import-export cargo flows, but the qualitative side as well, with the building of an up-to-date hangar complex for maintenance and repair services, expansion of cargo facilities to offer handling for special commodities and, most importantly, provision of all the resources needed from our side”.The pair also aim to encourage cooperation with other airports. By Alex Lennane 20/04/2016 © Lindrik last_img read more

Read more

first_imgBlackstone president Jonathan Gray (Getty; iStock)Blackstone’s bet on logistics facilities and life sciences continues to pay off despite the broader headwinds facing commercial real estate.The New York-based investment manager reported in its third-quarter earnings call that net income increased to $794.7 million in the third quarter, from $779.4 million the previous year. The company’s fee-related earnings from its real estate assets increased to $283 million, from $187 million during the same time period.Blackstone’s total assets under management increased to $584.4 billion in the third quarter, up 5 percent year-over-year, and its real estate assets increased 11 percent to $173.8 billion.In recent years, Blackstone — one of the largest commercial landlords in the country — has diversified its portfolio by investing in the industrial sector, including logistics and last-mile distribution centers, as well as life science buildings. Those have performed well this year, despite the broader economic downturn.“In real estate, we have been underscoring the importance of sector selection,” Blackstone president Jonathan Gray said on an earnings call with analysts.In the third quarter, Blackstone sold Cheniere Energy Partners to Brookfield Asset Management and Blackstone Infrastructure Partners for $7 billion. After the third quarter ended, the company recapitalized BioMed Realty Trust, life-sciences real estate investment trust, for $14.6 billion to another Blackstone-controlled fund. It also recently acquired Simply Self Storage’s 8 million-square-foot portfolio from Brookfield Asset Management for $1.2 billion.Blackstone deployed $2.1 billion in capital in real estate in the third quarter, which included acquiring a 49 percent stake in Hudson Pacific Properties’ Hollywood production studio and office portfolio in August.Top of mind for analysts during the earnings call was the forthcoming presidential election. Gray said if Democrats were to sweep, the company could see higher corporate taxes as well as more regulatory scrutiny. But he said there could also be some benefits to Blackstone’s infrastructure and renewable business. In addition, urban centers like New York and San Francisco, which are facing fiscal crises, could see more funding from the federal government, according to Gray.Blackstone’s stock price is down 2 percent to $50.84 since opening on Tuesday. Share via Shortlink TagsBlackstoneCommercial Real Estatecenter_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

Read more

first_img 2Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyKevin McIntosh Head of Production, Torus GamesA year ago My company worked with Disney Consumer Products during 2014-2015 and enjoyed the experience. We started with portions of the development, and as we proved ourselves we were given more titles and content to create. We had a growing influence on the product and creative control. There was certainly a focus on each element of the game, and we spoke frequently about details that some may see as minor to the experience, but it improved the overall quality of the product. Others had always warned with some horror stories about working directly with Disney, but the whole process was much smoother than I had been led to expect. We ended up winning Disney Developer of the Year for our work on a range of projects. The team at Disney knew games and product development well.My two cents is that Disney should be involved in their own products – licensing is a retreating business and devalues their brands when left in the hands of others. When I visited Disneyland a couple of years ago, I was amazed to see that the range of licenses that were represented, all the way back to brands which hadn’t been touched for 30+ years. They’ve done a great job of keeping some of their brands alive on low boil and cross-generational, as opposed to others who missed their opportunity. My kids understand if I make reference to Mickey Mouse or Mary Poppins (even before the reboot), but would look at me weird if I talked about Daffy Duck or Bugs Bunny. There are some big name licensing opportunities like Star Wars / EA which make sense (sort of), but it would be great to see a Disney game strategy. I’d be happy to contribute to that. 🙂 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyJeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing A year ago I would of thought Disney would primarily be after Nintendo.Would be a terrible idea for Nintendo, but I’m surprised Disney haven’t been pushing that for years. 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyChris Ochs Software Development 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyKlaus Preisinger Freelance Writing When will Disney get back into video games? | OpinionSuggesting Disney should buy Activision Blizzard is half correct; its gaming strategy needs re-evaluation, but that’s the wrong acquisitionRob FaheyContributing EditorFriday 5th July 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleActivision BlizzardThe Walt Disney CompanyWith the closing of Disney’s $71.3bn acquisition of most of Fox’ media properties, an updated image of the giant company’s holdings went viral online. Showing all of Disney’s interests and subsidiary companies on a single, appropriately Mickey-shaped diagram, it wasn’t entirely clear whether it was meant to shock or impress — but it certainly made clear the scale and reach of the company.From its immensely popular parks and resorts via movie studios and TV networks through to print publishing, merchandising and licensing, Disney has its fingers in almost every pie related to entertainment. Moreover, thanks to an incredible series of acquisitions over the past decade or so, Disney owns a fairly dramatic slice of the world’s most beloved entertainment franchises.Pixar (acquired in 2006), Marvel (2009), and Lucasfilm (2012) each brought with them incredibly valuable IP — Toy Story, The Avengers, Star Wars — and Fox is no different, not only reuniting a large part of Marvel’s film rights with the successful MCU franchise but also giving Disney ownership of everything from The Simpsons and National Geographic through to the Alien, Avatar and Independence Day franchises.”It’s weird that we’ve just capped off more than a decade of Marvel movies, and yet the closest thing to a game is a squad-based shooter that doesn’t use the MCU characters and isn’t out until next year” There is, however, one gaping hole in the Disney empire — and it’s no secret what it is. The company’s enormous ambitions in almost every other area of the media, including its aggressive attempt to corner a large part of the streaming video market with Disney+, simply don’t seem to extend to video games. The firm makes no bones about it; CEO Bob Iger told investors earlier this year that “the best place for us to be in that space is licensing and not publishing”, reiterating a party line that was set with the closure of Disney Interactive Studios back in 2016.The company’s ungracious exit from video games had been signalled for several years — it shut down several studios on its way out the door, including Black Rock (Split/Second) and Junction Point (Epic Mickey). Since then, it’s focused almost entirely on licensing out its properties, notably working with EA on Star Wars titles and with Square Enix on an upcoming Avengers game. At least one investor thinks Disney needs to suck up the taste of its former failures in this market and get back in the game; Nick Licouris at Gerber Kawasaki, which owns about $22 million worth of Disney shares, argued this week that the company should take advantage of the recently depressed share price of Activision Blizzard and make that into its next major acquisition target.Now, Gerber Kawasaki isn’t exactly a disinterested party here; the firm also owns about $4.3 million worth of Activision shares. That makes it easy to dismiss this story as “guy who would make a packet from Activision being bought by Disney thinks Disney should probably buy Activision, News at 11″ — but even if Gerber Kawasaki’s interest is obvious, the idea itself is worth thinking about a little.Since the struggles of Disney Infinity, the entertainment giant has had little direct involvement in video games, instead opting to license out if propertiesSure, Disney hasn’t had much success in running its own game studios — but it’s hard to see its current arms-length attitude to games as being in the company’s best interests. The firm’s prior failures in this market were largely attributable to a lack of experience and understanding of video games within Disney’s executive levels; the company had the know-how and background to successfully complete the integration of acquisitions like Lucasfilm and Marvel without damaging their creative cultures, but working with video games just proved a bridge too far.The result has been that despite licensing efforts, Disney’s IPs are dramatically underserved on the video games front. It’s not that anyone wants a return to the bad old days of undercooked tie-in titles being launched alongside every major movie release — ugh. But I think we sometimes don’t appreciate just how weird it is that we’ve just capped off more than a decade of Marvel movies with a $2.7bn grossing mega-hit like Avengers Endgame, and yet the closest thing there is to a game that will capitalise on that enthusiasm and love for the franchise is, um, a squad-based shooter that doesn’t use the MCU versions of the characters and isn’t out until next year. Let alone that we’re about to hit the third Star Wars film in a new trilogy — a new Star Wars trilogy! — and the fifth film made under the Disney banner, and so far all we’ve got to show for it is an online multiplayer FPS game from a couple of years back that people mostly remember for some very unpopular monetisation choices.”Disney is a little more active in mobile — but money spent on a license translates into a desperate need to monetise in incredibly aggressive ways” By comparison, Sony owns the tiniest sliver of the Marvel universe — Spider-Man and his associated characters — and it managed to spin that into one of the best PS4 games of the past year, linking it cleverly to the character’s history both in print and on screen, and even tying it to the brand new Spider-Man: Far From Home with both a free DLC for the game and a subtle nod in the movie itself.”Sony is pretty good at this video games lark” isn’t exactly a truth bomb, but the point stands that given only the tiniest fraction of the IP powerhouse Disney controls, the firm has managed to make video games and movies into a mutually beneficial circle (perfectly balanced, just as all things should be). Hell, for all that DC Comics has struggled terribly in Marvel’s shadow with its film adaptations, it’s knocking it into a cocked hat with games — the Arkham series of Batman games and the Injustice beat ’em ups are both solid franchises that both draw from and feed back into the IPs upon which they’re based. When Disney has found success with games in recent years, it’s largely only been in partnerships which mix its IPs into other companies’ formulae — revivals of Kingdom Hearts with Square Enix and of Marvel vs. Capcom with, well, Capcom being the key examples. By and large its licensing approach doesn’t seem to be working; it’s not just that it loses the company opportunities to tie together video games, TV shows and movies in interesting and compelling ways; that would be forgivable if licensing was resulting in world-class games that Disney didn’t feel it could create on its own, but that just doesn’t seem to be the case.If anything, the licensing approach seems to result in weaker games — perhaps because the inevitable bureaucratic overhead introduced by not one but two giant corporations leaning over the developers’ shoulders is a significant burden on creativity and speed. Or perhaps because the sheer amount of money involved in the license dampens the appetite for risk-taking in the creative process. Or perhaps simply because building games at arm’s length from the people who are creating everything else to do with the IP isn’t a great idea to begin with. This seems to be especially severe in the mobile space, where Disney is a little more active than in PC or console — but where the amount of money being spent on a license translates into a desperate need to monetise in incredibly aggressive, off-putting ways. Sony has demonstrated with Marvel’s Spider-Man how Disney-owned IP can be better adapted to the video games space, and even tie in with filmsIn short, whatever competence Disney thinks it lacks right now in games is a competence it should really be trying to acquire one way or the other, because “we’ll just license it out” isn’t an approach that’s going to wash forever for a company of this size and stature. Sure, Disney can’t do everything at once and right now it’s still focused on integrating the Fox acquisition and gearing up for an epic streaming showdown with Netflix — but this is a company that’s always in search of the next growth opportunity, so constantly overlooking a market the size of video games just isn’t an option. “Should Disney be buying Activision Blizzard? Oh, hell no” So, should Disney be buying Activision Blizzard? Oh, hell no. An acquisition of some kind might make sense for the firm — after all, if the issue is a lack of knowledge and experience of games in the C-suite, then a well-managed acquisition of a successful game publisher ought to come with that in droves.Good acquisitions, however, are additive; they bring growth to a company by allowing it to expand into new markets and find synergies with the existing business to the benefit of both sides. Activision may be cheap right now, at least by the standards of large game publishers — it would probably cost about $40 billion to acquire — but it’s cheap for a reason. It’s had a rough few years and hasn’t convincingly shown how it’s going to break out of that cycle; its knack for creating valuable new franchises seems to have faded and several of its biggest existing franchises seem to be slowly winding down. If Disney doesn’t have the know-how to handle game publishing on its own, it certainly doesn’t have the know-how to turn around an expensive acquisition that’s struggling somewhat.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Of course, Activision may well turn things around for itself — I have no doubt that it’s working hard on products designed to do just that, but until it proves itself, it’s hard to see how Disney would justify opening its war-chest for this acquisition.If Disney is shopping around, Activision isn’t the only company on the shelf. Indeed, for the kind of money Disney has paid for some acquisitions, it could go straight to the top — Sony’s market cap is only around $70 billion, which is an absolute steal for a firm that would bring with it another prestige film studio, a major music label and a huge consumer hardware empire, plus assorted billion-dollar odds and ends.That’s a pipe dream, of course, not least because Sony has absolutely no desire to be acquired right now — but if you flick through company valuations and daydream a little, you can find any number of better ways for Disney to get into this market — if and when it gets over its C-suite level reticence and realises that this is a sector it can’t afford to sit outside forever.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesActivision Blizzard wins patent lawsuit after nine yearsThe judge ruled that the patents were “not inventions” of Worlds Incorporated, which was suing for infringementBy Marie Dealessandri 6 days agoCall of Duty, King push Activision Blizzard to record Q1 revenuesPublisher’s revenues jump 27% to $2.28 billion as Call of Duty Mobile’s Chinese debut helps drive Activision division sales up 72% year-over-yearBy Brendan Sinclair 7 days agoLatest comments (11)Grant Stanton President, TSC Management Services GroupA year ago This will never change. There have been attempts since the 90’s and all have failed for the same reason….The Disney Way. Every knowledgeable game talent who has ever worked for them has experienced the unwanted and unneeded direction from Disney film and animation. Interference in all aspects of the development process by inexperienced Disney staffers is inevitable. 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyAbdulBasit Saliu Mechanic, Flowmotion Entertainment IncA year ago I will like to see AT&T Games (formerly WB Games) and a new Disney Interactive (from small studio acquisitions). Great article BTW. A year ago @Shane Sweeney: Disney is one of the very few companies that could merge with Nintendo. There are extremely few foreign companies that have the clout with the Japanese public to where it would be seen as good or a loss of face. Of course, Nintendo isn’t motivated in that sector right now due to their relationships with Geneon Universal and WB.It isn’t the production space, it’s that Disney is absolutely clueless when it comes to consumer goods. Everything they do and make is licensed and outsourced. They know how to make movies and experiences, but every single time they try to do anything in merch it bombs hard.Disney Infinity wasn’t a release quantity issue, it’s a pacing issue. They’re used to the box office where you make all your money in the first 30 days. it was that the guys in charge quintupled production runs in expensive to make toys after the initial sellout. I believe the line was “we sold a million Hulk toys, unfortunately we made two million” 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyRichard Browne Head of External Projects, Digital ExtremesA year ago Don’t know how to do merch? What the Company with 400 stores worldwide and billions in revenue from it? Disney’s pretty good at everything bar interactive ; their hiring in the space has always been poor and acquisitions curious at best. the fact their mobile success was down more to original brands by inspired internal creatives (Where’s My Water) shows how inept the management was there. But Disney’s bigger problem in Interactive is brand based and their protection of that. Activision is a non-starter ; Call of Duty shooting women and children terrorists under the Disney umbrella? Yeah that’s hard to see. Now they have Fox one could argue they have an out but that really depends how they handle that brand. We shall see. A year ago Disney has an assembly line of content that is unimaginable in video game terms. For starters, they have at least 10 major movies each year which they expect to gross extremely well. Star Wars Solo at $400 million isn’t defended much if people call it a flop and the makers of it have a social media breakdown. I want to see any video game studio head accuse their audience of not getting it after making $400 million in the first four weeks on this site.Disney could buy EA, Activision, Ubisoft and Take 2 and their combined output would still not satisfy Disney’s idea of production pace. In my opinion, Disney would not enter the video game space as one publisher of many. It would enter on the level of Sony and Microsoft, be their own platform, with an all year round schedule of $60 Disney games. In essence, buy Sony.center_img 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyJeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing A year ago Microsoft’s Disneyland game is pretty enjoyable for the most part. Some mini games were clunky, but I had a lot of fun 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyAdam Campbell Product Manager, AzoomeeA year ago @Jeff Kleist: Doesn’t the Japanese government get involved when it comes to potentially huge foreign acquisitions? 2Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyJeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing A year ago @Richard Browne:They don’t do it, they approve it. There is no Disney clothing factory or division.They outsource basically everything you see at Disney parks. They don’t produce their own toys, they don’t produce their own shirts. The most iconic Disney merch, the watch and the phone both were made by third parties. Here’s a fan site complaining about this very thinghttp://studioscentral.com/studiosweekly/the-big-problems-with-walt-disney-world/Disney Infinity was the first time they tried to make their own toys. We’ve seen what happens when they try to make their own games. 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replyShow all comments (11)Shane Sweeney Academic A year ago I was at studio acquired by Disney and experienced first hand what happens. The Disney Way indeed. These people are just entirely unsuited for the game industry. It’s not just operations, they don’t understand the industry well enough to even make smart acquisitions.The acquisition I was a part of Disney got everything wrong you could get wrong from the start. Their valuation was completely off, they overpaid. They then did everything they could to kill it off, which is exactly what happened.So it’s to their credit I think that they stay out of making games. But invariably they will try again once the sting and lessons learned from the last failure start to fade. Edited 1 times. Last edit by Adam Campbell on 8th July 2019 2:40pm 0Sign inorRegisterto rate and replySign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Read more

first_imgEpic Games commits to loot box transparency across portfolioTHQ Nordic also weighs in on ESA pledges: “We do not plan to implement casino-styled mechanics in our games”Rebekah ValentineSenior Staff WriterFriday 9th August 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleEpic GamesTHQ NordicEpic Games and THQ Nordic are joining the growing list of major companies weighing in on the issues surrounding loot boxes this week, with the former pledging continued transparency and the latter saying it has no plans to implement the mechanic at all.Earlier this week, the ESA announced that the three major platform holders — Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony — would commit to policies requiring new games released on their platforms to disclose odds on any loot boxes they contained, beginning in 2020. Other ESA members also pledging the same include Activision Blizzard, Bandai Namco Entertainment, Bethesda, Bungie, Electronic Arts, Take-Two Interactive, Ubisoft, Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment, and Wizards of the Coast.That did still leave a number of ESA members outside of that commitment, notably including Epic Games. Epic has worked toward improved transparency on loot boxes lately, including disclosing the content of loot boxes before purchase in Fortnite: Save the World as of January this year, and doing the same for Psyonix’s Rocket League just this week.In a statement to GamesIndustry.biz, Epic said it would implement the same policy on all its future titles as well.”Earlier this year, the Fortnite Save the World team made a change that showed players every item that they would get in a paid llama before opening it,” the statement reads. “Earlier this week, the team at Psyonix announced a similar change coming later this year to paid crates in Rocket League. Going forward, we’re committed to the same transparency for player purchases in all Epic Games titles.”GamesIndustry.biz reached out to Epic Games to ask whether this policy will also extend to games published on the Epic Games store, and not just titles specifically published by Epic. Epic Games declined to comment or clarify.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games THQ Nordic is another company on the list of ESA members that did not commit to the pledge. However, on Twitter, the company officially weighed in and said that it was not even asked by the ESA for such a commitment, given that it has not published a single game containing a loot box.”We do not plan to implement casino-styled mechanics in our games,” the company added.It was a busy week for loot box discussions in general as the US Federal Trade Commission held a day-long event called “Inside the Game: Unlocking the Consumer Issues Surrounding Loot Boxes” to inform its regulatory decisions going forward. At the series of talks, the FTC learned about the industry’s goals for self-regulation, heard academics share studies and concerns surrounding monetization, and listened to consumer advocates claim that odds disclosure is just the start of what needs to be done.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesTHQ Nordic acquires Kaiko, Appeal, and Massive Miniteam Publisher’s latest acquisitions include its frequent partner for modern remasters, the developer of Outcast, and the studio behind SpitlingsBy Brendan Sinclair 6 hours agoEpic vs Apple – Week One Review: Epic still faces an “uphill battle”Legal experts share their thoughts on the proceedings so far, and what to expect from the coming weekBy James Batchelor 10 hours agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Read more

first_imgThe School of Applied Health Sciences and Wellness at OhioUniversity invites applications for a full time, 9-month Assistantor Associate Professor of Instruction (non-tenure track) positionin the Division of Food and Nutrition Sciences beginning August 15,2021. The division is looking for an experienced, student-friendlycolleague with teaching experience and a passion for issues relatedto environmental and sustainable nutrition. The division iscollegial with respect to course offerings and the specific courseload will be based on the candidate’s strengths and the needs ofthe division. The candidate is expected to participate in serviceto the school, college and university and advise undergraduatestudents.The division takes pride in our forward-thinking curriculum. Theundergraduate program has four areas of opportunity forundergraduate majors (Dietetics, Culinary Nutrition, EnvironmentalNutrition, and Pre-Professional Nutrition Science) as well as aminor (Applied Nutrition) and two certificate programs (Diabetes,Sports Nutrition). The Environmental Nutrition concentration, astrong focus of this position, will soon offer early assurance toincoming freshman of a 4+1 pathway to a BS/MS for students whomaintain program requirements. The graduate program offers a M.S.in Food and Nutrition Sciences in three modalities: a fully onlinecurriculum, a traditional face-to-face experience, and a MScombined with a dietetics internship focused on communitywellness.Environmental and sustainable nutrition is a particular focus ofthis position and we seek candidates who also have the expertise toprepare and teach lower- and upper-level undergraduate and graduatecourses across the curriculum, such as basic nutrition, medicalnutrition therapy, pediatric nutrition, nutrient metabolism, etc.In addition, the successful candidate will be expected to mentorundergraduates in professional practice. Standard teaching dutiesfor this position will be 4 courses (12 credit hours total) persemester.The candidate will be responsible for leadership in the continueddevelopment, implementation, marketing, and recruitment of studentsinterested in environmental and sustainable nutrition. We seek anintrepid colleague who can forge non-traditional horizontalrelationships across like-minded units at the university. We seek acolleague who will get their hands dirty at the OHIO Student Farm.We week a candidate who will work collaboratively with colleaguesat OHIO Culinary (food services) and with external partners. Weseek a candidate who will champion new educational initiatives inthe area of environmental and sustainable nutrition that will driveexpanded enrollment.The successful candidate will grow our existing collaborativerelationships between the community and Ohio University. We takepride in our vibrant residential campus that attracts top qualitystudents. Athens, Ohio, is a quintessential college town and is afamily-friendly and culturally rich community located amidst scenicstate and national parks/forests just 75 minutes southeast ofColumbus, Ohio.last_img read more

Read more

first_imgShareTweetShareShareEmail Related Items:Ljubomir Vranjes, Telekom Veszprem Recommended for you ShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsMore than a half Handball-Planet.com visitors who joined our Poll to response on question “Vranjes departure: Good or bad decision for Veszprem?” think that this was BAD decision for the Hungarian vice-champions and three-times EHF Champions League finalists.Exactly 54% of visitors think that this won’t give positive impact to the team, while 46% have opinion that better days for Telekom Veszprem are coming with Swedish coach departure.VIDEO: This is how Ljubomir Vranjes speaks on arrival in Veszprem HUNGARIAN CUP: Veszprém defeated Szeged in the great battle Veszprem beat Motor on Cupara’s wings – Barca beat Nantes in thriller Click to comment Telekom Veszprem announce 2021/2022 squad Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Read more

first_imgEmancipator has announced some major plans for the coming fall season! The producer has just announced the release date for his new album, Seven Seas, and shared the title track of the album. The full release is due out on September 25th. You can listen to “Seven Seas” below:In support of the new release, Emancipator is bringing his ensemble out on the road for an extensive fall tour. He’ll also be bringing along Wax Tailor and Yppah for the first half of the tour, between 9/29-10/31, and Blockhead and Manatee Commune for the second half, from 11/10-11/22.You can check out the full tour schedule in the poster below. Fan Club tickets and album pre-sales are available via Emancipator’s official website.last_img

Read more