Category: ggggwnsh

first_img Cyber security solutions that are only 95 per cent effective are just not good enough anymore Opinion More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org Tags: Bank of England Dan Turner We wouldn’t satisfy ourselves with a seatbelt that worked 95 per cent of the time, nor a front-door lock that could be opened five times in 100. Yet in a world where data is the new currency and consumers vote with their feet, the cyber security industry appears to expect its customers to introduce that level of risk into their organisation.Read more: Face off: iProov’s facial verification system lets you prove who you areI know the issue first-hand. In a previous role, I had to explain to a US Fortune 30 brand why it had suffered multiple breaches over a three-month period, despite being told that it had the best detection capability that money could buy.In response, one board member simply said, “Dan, this best endeavour approach to detection gives us unquantifiable business risk – that’s unacceptable to our shareholders”.He was right – it is unacceptable. Yet most companies seem resigned to accepting this risk for their own business and customers. As it stands, there is very little incentive for the industry to do better. The cyber security market is expected to reach $300bn by 2024, with providers making a lot of money from selling fallible, sub-par solutions.That’s not because 100 per cent secure solutions are not possible – indeed, we’ve proven that they are. By moving away from the traditional detection-based approach, new and wholly effective attack-prevention systems can and are being created.Read more: Bank of England director calls for ‘collective solution’ to cyber threatsBut we will only reach the tipping point where businesses reject the mantra that “95 per cent secure is good enough” when they start to feel the repercussions beyond an initial breach. Insurers and government watchdogs must step away from the culture of “best endeavours” and hold businesses accountable when they are breached due to the use of fallible solutions.There are plenty of examples of this, going back as far as 2015, when a complaint was filed against California healthcare provider, Cottage Health System, by its cyber insurer, after it was discovered that it hadn’t met the “minimum required practices” when it had been breached. Share City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. Thursday 16 May 2019 11:32 am whatsapp Insurers and watchdogs must go further and make it clear that they will not pay out when companies have knowingly introduced the unquantifiable risk of sub-par security into their business.Indeed, only when businesses understand that they are being failed by their security providers, and are being penalised as a result, will there be enough uproar to force the cyber security industry to shift away from improving fallible technology and towards finding novel solutions that truly prevent attacks. whatsapp The cyber security industry is failing businesses. Cyber criminals are constantly evolving and evading the market’s most sophisticated detection-based security solutions, with government figures showing that 32 per cent of UK businesses have faced a cyber attack or data breach in the past year.Most security solutions take a “best endeavour” approach to defending against threats – offering little more than 95 per cent protection at best.last_img read more

Read more

first_imgCoronavirus | Juneau | Local GovernmentLimited reagent supply may bottleneck Juneau’s new COVID-19 testing systemDecember 29, 2020 by Jeremy Hsieh, KTOO Share:Update | 10:56 a.m. ThursdaySpherical viral particles have been colorized blue in this transmission electron microscopic image of a tissue sample from the first person in the United States to have COVID-19. (Image by Hannah A. Bullock and Azaibi Tamin/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Juneau city officials say Bartlett Regional Hospital workers have finished their training on a new system for processing COVID-19 tests in town.Deputy City Manager Mila Cosgrove said they still have to run trials to make sure it works.“It is quite a complicated piece of machinery, and there’s a lot that goes into making sure it’s reading those testing samples correctly,” she said.It’s expected to go into service in mid-January.The lab can process almost 400 COVID-19 tests in an 8-hour shift. That’s enough to cover Juneau’s daily needs so far, and potentially neighbors’ in the region. It would also cut turnaround time for results from a few days to the same day.However, city officials say the vendor Roche can for now only provide enough of the chemicals used to process test samples, or reagents, for 940 tests a week.“With all of these types of machines, the reagent is proprietary, so it does come directly from the vendor,” said emergency planning chief Robert Barr. “Whichever vendor that you source the system from, the reagent has to come from that same vendor. And that is true with Roche as well.”Barr said spoilage isn’t much of an issue, so when testing needs are low, the leftover reagent can be stored.The officials spoke during the city’s weekly COVID-19 community update on Tuesday. They also noted more than 250 people a day were coming to town by plane around Christmas, which is relatively high.City Manager Rorie Watt discouraged big New Year’s Eve parties, and urged travelers to do more than what’s been mandated.“Strong encouragement to people flying into Juneau: Even if you’re not required to get a test if you’re coming in state or maybe you’ve got such a short duration trip, go ahead and get tested at the airport,” Watt said. “And do the strict social distancing, follow the guidelines anyway.”As of Tuesday, city officials know of 44 people with active COVID-19 cases in Juneau, including one person being treated at Bartlett Regional Hospital.Original post | 2:16 p.m. WednesdayJuneau city officials are holding their weekly COVID-19 community update at 4 p.m. today over video conference. You can watch on this post, on the City and Borough of Juneau’s Facebook page or on Zoom.The public can submit questions in advance to [email protected] of Monday evening, city officials know of 52 people with active cases in Juneau, including one person at Bartlett Regional Hospital. They found 19 new cases from Dec. 25 through Monday.The emergency operations center also reported Monday that staff at the hospital have finished training on a new testing machine. It’s expected to go into service by mid-January. The lab can process almost 400 COVID-19 tests in an 8-hour shift. That’s enough to cover Juneau’s daily needs so far, and potentially neighbors’ in the region. It would also cut turnaround time for results from a few days to the same day.However, city officials say the vendor, Roche, for now can only provide enough reagent for 940 tests a week. Share this story:last_img read more

Read more

first_img New Premium subscriber REGISTER It is a race against time for DSV, so I am on M&A high alert, as usual, when the Danish freight forwarder is in the limelight – because if Switzerland’s Panalpina is the target, that could move the M&A needle in transport and logistics. DSV is the bidder that could do wonders to confidence in logistics deal-making.Value, what value? Since DSV said it would “not pursue an acquisition of Ceva” in late October, a trading update, followed by a rather … Reset Premium subscriber LOGIN LOGIN Password* Email* Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Email* Reset Your Password Forgotten your password? Please click here Please Login By Alessandro Pasetti 03/12/2018 << Go back Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premiumlast_img read more

Read more

first_img GAA 2018 Remembered – My Farming Life: Dairy Farming, Lecturing, Physiotherapy and IFA… Meet the woman that does it all In February LaoisToday interviewed Alison Holmes for My Farming Life. We found out how she juggles physiotherapy with farming and got her advice for young farmers.Alison Holmes is our feature farmer in this week’s My Farming Life. Currently a lecturer in University of Limerick, as well as having a physiotherapy practice in Mountmellick, she has taken the big step of setting up a dairy enterprise with her dad.At the moment Alison is the team physio for the Laois senior hurling team, having previously been the physio for Kilkenny. We decided to find out how she does it all and why she decided farming was for her.Q – What type of farm do you have?My farm is a mixed dairy and beef enterprise.Q – Before entering in a farming partnership with your Dad, was it always a goal of yours to enter farming in a high capacity?Yes. I have always had an interest and have been involved in farming at home.Q – When you decided to enter the partnership, did your father encourage you or what was his thinking behind your decision? Facebook GAA WhatsApp TAGS2018 RememberedAlison HolmesLaois IFAMy Farming LifeUniversity of Limerick 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin A succession partnership was always the main aim, I was lucky that Dad was very open to the arrangement and it was always an available option to me if I wanted to farm, but equally if I didn’t there was no pressure to.Q – Where did you acquire your farming knowledge? (e.g. Green Cert/Ag Science Degree/Father or Family)I did my green cert in 2012 but most of what I know about farming was learnt farming alongside my Dad and my grandparents. Peer learning is also very important, learning from other’s experiences is really important. Also engaging in continuing professional development opportunities such as courses run by Macra Skillnet, IFA and our local discussion groups are very important to keep up to date with best methods and practices.Q – What is your favourite aspects of farming?The variety and sense of satisfaction when you complete projects or put something into practice that improves outcomes and production.Q – What is your least favourite aspect of farming?The dependency on the weather and Sunday evening milkings!!!Q – Do you think farming is sustainable as a full-time job, or do you think farmers need an outside income to keep going forward?I think it can be sustainable as a full time job, but it can also be a tough career choice and it takes a lot of time, effort, resilience and patience to develop as a sustainable business, like any self employment based enterprise.Q – What is your daily routine? (including farming/career/other activities)This varies a lot depending on the time of the year, at the moment it’s farming, physio, sport, sleep, repeat!Q – What time of the year are you most busy on the farm and why?From the end of January to the end of April is definitely our busiest time. Between calving and calf rearing (and the associated paperwork!!!), milking, animal nutrition and fertility, animals being housed, herd tests, trying to get paddocks ready for grazing, it’s all go!Q – What is your favourite time of year on the farm?Turn out to grass!!!Q – Do you have a career outside of farming and what does it involve?Yes. I am a chartered physiotherapist. I work as a clinical tutor for University of Limerick and also have a private practice partnership, The Physio Centre, in Mountmellick with Niamh O’Loughlin. It’s a bit like farming, varied, can be extremely busy and equally as satisfying when you see your efforts and those of patients, reaping rewards and successful outcomes.Q – You are involved in both the IFA and Macra, what role do you have in those organisations and what do the organisations do for you?I am currently Ag Affairs Chair in Laois Macra, which mostly consists of organising educational events and farm walks for our Young Farmer Discussion Group members. I am also a member of the National Macra na Ferime Skillnet Steering group which is a great asset in ongoing education that Macra has developed for young farmers nationwide. I was recently elected as chair of Camross IFA and completed the IFA Young Leadership course after being lucky enough to be chosen as the Laois IFA delegate for the programme. There are some very energetic people working very hard for the agriculture industry in Laois and representing Laois at a national level, such as Francie Gorman in IFA and James Barber in Macra. It’s easy to hold roles within the organisations when you have experienced members and back up like that available to you.Q – Being so busy in your career as a physiotherapist, being involved in both the IFA and Macra as well as farming with your dad, is it difficult to manage your time correctly?Well considering how overdue I was in getting back to you I’ll let you answer that one!Q – Has your priorities changed between your career and farming since becoming so heavily involved in the family farm? Which do you tend to focus more on at the moment or do you try keep them at an even balance?I try to keep them at an even balance overall, some days farming gets priority and other days it’s work. Organisation is key! I’m a big believer in to do lists, routine and effective delegation. That’s probably the reason I got a selection of diaries as Christmas presents.Q – In five years’ time, do you feel that you will have moved towards becoming a full-time farmer or will physiotherapy still be a big part of your life?I think physiotherapy will still be part of my life as I won’t have finished my PhD by then. It will probably be a lesser element in 10 years time as I envision I will be farming more and potentially progressing towards an agri tourism venture.Q – Final question, if you had one piece of advice for a young person who was thinking of choosing a career in farming what would it be?Be mindful of work / life balance, don’t isolate yourselves, always look at the bigger picture and be safe not a statistic!!!SEE ALSO – Moment in Time: Clough-Ballacolla Dinner Dance 2010 Pinterest Pinterest Twittercenter_img Previous article2018 Remembered – Home interior store is the latest business casualty in PortlaoiseNext articleLIVE BLOG: Camross and The Harps face off again in U-21 hurling final LaoisToday Reporter WhatsApp Facebook Home We Are Laois 2018 Remembered – My Farming Life: Dairy Farming, Lecturing, Physiotherapy and… We Are Laois Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results GAA By LaoisToday Reporter – 22nd December 2018 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitterlast_img read more

Read more

first_img SHARE News News News Displaced families seek more active role to bring Koreas together Millions of families have been separatedsince the military border between the two Koreas was created in the1950-53 Korean War and these decades have driven the two countries apart inalmost every way imaginable. An important step in fusing this ever-widening gap can be made by South Koreans displaced by the Korean War and theirdescendants, according to a group of experts at a recent conference hosted bythe Donghwa Institute in Seoul. This robust contingent could and should play amajor role in bridging the economic disparity between the two Koreas andmending other broken ties in the process. Kim Moo Sung, a delegate from the rulingSaenuri Party, opened the seminar by emphasizing, in broad strokes, the significanteconomic benefits that  reunification would bring to the Korean Peninsula.For example, Kim stated, “Korea would be able to utilize railroads in Russia,which would reduce the cost of trade. Reunification would also halve ourexpenditures on national defense.” Lee Woo Youl, a professor from KonkukUniversity, expanded on this point, noting that to better prepare for such an event, encouraging and fostering an environment wherein North Korea couldadopt a system similar to that of China when it opened its economy in the late1970s and 1980s would prove invaluable to quell many of the concernssurrounding a united Korea. Until that day, however, Joo Sung Ha of theDong-A Ilbo urged for more South Korean investment north of the 38th parallel.He conceded that the issue is a divisive one–many argue that economicinvestment in the North would merely strengthen and prolong Kim Jong Un’sregime; nevertheless, unknown variables like “an abrupt collapse or assassinationscenario” should override such misgivings and illuminate the need for moreeconomic inroads, he asserted. “The South Korean public thinks thatreunification will be an economic boon for both Koreas, given North’s cheaplabor and profusion of underground resources,” Joo explained, “but South Koreawill not be able to profit from these advantages if it does not make take stepsto create jobs for the North Korean citizens now.” Within a North Korean collapse scenario,for instance, exists a high probability for scores of young, able North Koreanlaborers relocating to China or South Korea for work.. This was, the reporterwent on, the case in Germany’s own reunification, wherein countless youngEast German laborers moved to West Germany to the same end. Joo applied an app example to underpin thisassertion, noting that the former East Germany’s economic growth rate stilllags behind that of the former West Germany, despite the fact that more than 20years have passed since the two Germanies reunited. This gap, at least in part,can be traced back to the dislocation of East German laborers following thefall of the Berlin Wall. So, then, “once North Korean laborerssettle and achieve economic stability in China or Seoul, they are not likely tore-settle in their hometowns,” Joo pointed out. To stave off further wideningof the gaping economic disparity driving apart the two Koreas, citizens in theSouth with ties to the North to step up and play a larger role in the solutionby making investments in their hometowns North of the border while urgingfor bilateral government support to do so. “North Korean defectors in South Korea aretoo busy making ends meet and adjusting to their new lives in the South [tofill this role],” he pointed out. This, according to Joo, is where thosedisplaced during the conflict and/or their descendants, who have stronger bondsto the North than other South Koreans, come in. “If senior citizens from thiscontingent collect money to build a hospital or donate a TV to schools in theirhometowns, that can not only bridge the economic gap, but also give NorthKoreans a positive perception about the capitalist South Korean society. Theywill think, ‘The capitalist South Korean society affords citizens the chance tofinancially succeed enough to make these donations.’” He cited the example of Chung Ju Young, thefounder of the Hyundai Group. who was born in born and grew up in North Korea’sKangwon Province. Chung gifted 1,001 cows to North Korea in 1998 and built apublic gymnasium in Pyongyang, which is named after him. “North Korea has a public gymnasium in itscapital named after a capitalist — something contrary to the tenants ofsocialism,” Joo said. Needless to say, bilateral governmentsupport is imperative to mold these good intentions into real results. “Korean-Americansfrom North Korea have been able to visit their hometowns in the North since1980s. It is unfair that South Koreans from the North cannot do the same,”he said, urging for more pressure on both sides from these would-be investors. Lee Chan Young, a researcher from DonghwaInstitute, agreed, commenting that his own father was originally from NorthKorea but passed away seventeen years ago without the opportunity to go back.For Lee, the sense of connection with the North has only grown stronger withtime, and by consolidating resources–and hope–with like-minded individuals, hesees major potential for  economic investments and development in NorthKorea on the horizon.  Image: Daily NK AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] News RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with China Ordinary Pyongyang residents have not received government rations since mid-April By Daily NK – 2015.11.27 2:04pm Facebook Twitter Hamhung man arrested for corruption while working at a state-run department storelast_img read more

Read more

Related news Manulife, Sun Life report modest impact from Hong Kong turmoil Sun Life Financial buying Pinnacle Care International Manulife Canada CEO sees Apple and Netflix as competitors as insurance evolves Fitch says that while many companies in the industry claim they already go beyond contractual obligations when examining policies and seeking to identify potential death benefits that should be paid, “We feel this is an area where regulators are seeking tighter guidelines and requirements.” In the near term, Fitch says it expects that these changes “will result in an increase in claim payments and additional expenses as insurers adapt to new, still-evolving regulatory requirements and respond to legal challenges.” However, it also says that it believes that the charges associated with new reforms will be manageable, and that insurers’ credit ratings will not be affected. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter U.S. life insurers are facing higher costs as they change their claim-payment practices in response to recent regulatory reform initiatives and legal challenges, says Fitch Ratings in a new report. In a new report, Fitch observes that several large U.S. life insurers have been criticized for being lax at identifying and transferring unpaid life insurance policies. As a result, several state regulators, including New York and Illinois, have issued letters instructing life insurers to use available federal data to make appropriate death benefit payments to beneficiaries, and to pay the state if the policies are deemed abandoned property. The industry has also seen an increase in litigation stemming from claim-payment practices, it notes. James Langton Keywords Life insurance industry Share this article and your comments with peers on social media read more

Read more

first_imgGovernor-General Appoints Police (Civilian Oversight) Authority UncategorizedSeptember 1, 2006 Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Professor Kenneth Hall, has appointed the Chairman and members of the Police (Civilian Oversight) Authority, with effect from August 21, 2006.A release from King’s House states that the Most Reverend Bishop Charles Dufour, has been appointed Chairman. The other members are: Dr. George Phillip, Oliver Clarke, Gladstone Lewars, and Rudolph Hamilton.The Authority usually consists of five to seven members, including the Chairman, and is appointed by the Governor-General after consultation with the Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition. The appointed Chairman and members will serve for five years.According to the Police (Civilian Oversight) Authority Act of 2005, its main functions are to:Monitor the implementation of policy relating to the Force and the Auxiliaries.Monitor the standard of performance of the Force and the Auxiliaries, so as to ensure that internationally accepted standards of policing are maintained, and to report thereon.Conduct inspections of the Force and the Auxiliaries.Monitor the management and use of the financial and other resources of the Force and the Auxiliaries.Perform such other functions as may be necessary for promoting the efficiency of the Force and the Auxiliaries. RelatedGovernor-General Appoints Police (Civilian Oversight) Authoritycenter_img RelatedGovernor-General Appoints Police (Civilian Oversight) Authority RelatedGovernor-General Appoints Police (Civilian Oversight) Authoritylast_img read more

Read more

first_imgArbitrators Participate in Training Workshop UncategorizedApril 4, 2008 RelatedArbitrators Participate in Training Workshop Advertisements RelatedArbitrators Participate in Training Workshopcenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Caribbean Chapter of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators now has 30 new Associate members, bringing the total membership to 45, following a recently concluded training workshop at the Courtleigh Hotel, in Kingston.The disclosure was made by Convener and Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, Caribbean Chapter, John Bassie during an interview with JIS News.“The Chapter now has a sizable body and basically we are looking to have these associate members move up to the other level of membership, ultimately hoping that they will be fellows in the years to come,” Mr. Bassie explained.“The workshop provided people who are qualified to review international commercial arbitration and in fact be arbitrators in such matters and can get the relevant experience,” he noted.According to the Convenor, the new members will be under the umbrella of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators – Caribbean Chapter and will receive the fullest support of the Institute.The participants in the workshop consisted of attorneys-at-law, engineers and representatives from the private sector.“It was a very good mix and so it should be noted that arbitrators do not have to be attorneys and vice versa, but we welcome persons from all professions because they offer different levels of expertise to the concept of arbitration,”Mr. Bassie explained.The programme was led by the world renowned Bermudan arbitrator and lecturer, Mr. Jeffrey Elkinson and covered areas such as international arbitration, litigation, powers and jurisdiction of Arbitral Tribunals, statements of claims and defence, role play sessions, among other topics.Attorney-at-Law, Marguerite Macaulay, who participated in the one-day workshop, said it was interesting and represented a “good start for our arbitrators to work in Jamaica, the Commonwealth and the rest of the world.”Meanwhile, mediator Conroy Daley of the Bethel Baptist Church noted that the workshop had whet his appetite to become a full-time arbitrator considering that there is a need for people to resolve disputes outside of the formal legal system.The workshop was the first of its kind and the arbitrators can be contacted through the Dispute Resolution Foundation at the Peace Centre, 5 Camp Road, Kingston. RelatedArbitrators Participate in Training Workshoplast_img read more

Read more

first_imgMinister Ng speaks with France’s Minister Delegate for Foreign Trade and Economic Attractiveness From: Global Affairs CanadaReadoutsThe Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade, yesterday spoke with Franck Riester, France’s Minister Delegate for Foreign Trade and Economic Attractiveness, to discuss economic recovery from COVID-19 and strengthen the two countries’ trade relationship.The Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade, yesterday spoke with Franck Riester, France’s Minister Delegate for Foreign Trade and Economic Attractiveness, to discuss economic recovery from COVID-19 and strengthen the two countries’ trade relationship.The ministers spoke about the many areas of commonality shared by Canada and France, including their commitment to the Paris Agreement and fighting climate change, as well as their work to advance artificial intelligence, clean technology, and innovation. The ministers agreed they should work closer together to benefit small businesses and workers in these sectors.Following up on their conversation in September 2020, Minister Ng again highlighted the third anniversary of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) and the importance of rules-based international trade in overcoming challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Minister Ng noted the launch of France’s recent economic, social, and environmental recovery plan, and the two ministers discussed possible avenues for collaboration.The ministers highlighted their respective countries’ significant investments in ensuring that COVID-19 vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics are available and affordable for their citizens and equitably distributed to people around the world.Minister Ng also offered her condolences to the families and loved ones of the victims of the recent terrorist attacks in Nice. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:agreement, anniversary, artificial intelligence, business, Canada, climate change, covid-19, foreign trade, France, Government, innovation, intelligence, International trade, Minister, Paris, Small Business, technologylast_img read more

Read more

first_imgScientists put stopwatch on cannabis intoxication New analysis from the Lambert Initiative defines durations of impairment after inhaled or oral THC doses. Findings raise questions about current drug-driving laws, which penalise for THC presence, not intoxication levels. Dr Danielle McCartney from the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics.A comprehensive analysis of 80 scientific studies has identified a ‘window of impairment’ of between three and 10 hours caused by moderate to high doses of the intoxicating component of cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The findings have implications for the application of drug-driving laws globally, researchers say.The study found the exact duration of impairment depends on the dose of THC, whether the THC is inhaled or taken orally, whether the cannabis user is regular or occasional and the demands of the task being undertaken while intoxicated.The study represents the first such meta-analysis and distilled the results of 80 separate scientific studies into THC-induced impairment conducted over the past 20 years. It has been published in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews.“Legal cannabis use, both medical and non-medical, is increasingly common across the world,” said lead author Dr Danielle McCartney from the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney.“THC is known to acutely impair driving and cognitive performance but many users are unsure how long this impairment lasts and when they can resume safety-sensitive tasks, such as driving, after cannabis consumption.“Our analysis indicates that impairment may last up to 10 hours if high doses of THC are consumed orally. A more typical duration of impairment, however, is four hours, when lower doses of THC are consumed via smoking or vaporisation and simpler tasks are undertaken (e.g., those using cognitive skills such as reaction time, sustained attention and working memory).“This impairment may extend up to six or seven hours if higher doses of THC are inhaled and complex tasks, such as driving, are assessed.”For this study a moderate THC dose is about 10 milligrams, but researchers say what is moderate for a regular user could be high for an occasional user.Co-author Dr Thomas Arkell, also from the Lambert Initiative, said: “We found that impairment is much more predictable in occasional cannabis users than regular cannabis users. Heavy users show significant tolerance to the effects of cannabis on driving and cognitive function, while typically displaying some impairment.”The authors noted that regular users might consume more cannabis to achieve an effect, leading to an equivalent amount of impairment.Many medicinal cannabis users consume THC in the form of oils, sprays or capsules and another important finding was that with such oral use the impairment takes longer to appear and lasts significantly longer than with inhaling.Researchers said that the findings have implications for so-called drug-driving laws.Mobile drug testing by the NSW Police. Source: NSW GovernmentAcademic Director of the Lambert Initiative, Professor Iain McGregor, said: “THC can be detected in the body weeks after cannabis consumption while it is clear that impairment lasts for a much shorter period of time. Our legal frameworks probably need to catch up with that and, as with alcohol, focus on the interval when users are more of a risk to themselves and others. Prosecution solely on the basis of the presence of THC in blood or saliva is manifestly unjust.“Laws should be about safety on the roads, not arbitrary punishment. Given that cannabis is legal in an increasing number of jurisdictions, we need an evidence-based approach to drug-driving laws,” Professor McGregor said.This paper follows recent research by Dr Arkell and colleagues that shows one of the medically active components of cannabis, cannabidiol (CBD) does not cause impairment in driving.DeclarationThis study was funded by the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics.About the Lambert InitiativeThe Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney provides national and international leadership both in the science of medicinal cannabis and in the discovery and development of cannabis-based medicines.It was established thanks to a philanthropic donation by Barry and Joy Lambert. /University Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Barry, cognitive, Discovery, Government, leadership, medicinal cannabis, neuroscience, NSW, NSW Police, Professor, prosecution, Scientists, Sydney, therapeutics, university, University of Sydneylast_img read more

Read more